Chronology of Events
Village of Niles Center / Skokie, Illinois


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Chronology of Events
Village of Niles Center / Skokie, Illinois
1500 A.D. to 2000 A.D.


1500 to 1699

ca. 1500    The Neshnabek ("The True People") Indians migrate from the land north of Lakes Superior and Huron to an area along the eastern shore of lower Lake Michigan stretching from Ludington to St. Joseph. (Indians of North America, The Potawatomi, James A. Clifton, Chelsea House Publishers, New York, 1987, p. 16.) This was the first migration.

1564   (April 23)    William Shakespeare is born in England. (Encyclopedia Britannica, Multimedia Edition, 1999).

1607   (May 24)    Three ships carrying approximately 80 Englishman disembark at Jamestown, Virginia thus establishing the first English settlement in the United States. (Encyclopedia of American History, Richard B. Morris (ed.), Harper Brothers, 1953, p. 26).

1616   (April 23)    William Shakespeare dies on his 52nd birthday. (Encyclopedia Britannica, Multimedia Edition, 1999).

1634    Members of the Neshnabek Indian Tribe cross Lake Michigan in their canoes to meet the French Explorer, Jean Nicolet, at Red Bank, Door County, Wisconsin. It is during this encounter that the Neshnabek tribe becomes known as the "Pouutouatami" which meant, to Nicolet, "the Firemakers" (Clifton, op.cit., p. 20).

ca. 1641 - 50    A confederacy of Iroquoian tribes from the Ontario peninsula attacks the Potawatomi, Sac, Fox, Kickapoo and Miami tribes living along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan. The Potawatomi relocate to present day Wisconsin around Green Bay and Door County, joining the Winnebago and Menominee Indian tribes. (Clifton, op.cit., p. 23-4). This was the second migration.

1653    The Potawatomi and other Wisconsin tribes defeat the invading Iroquois Indians at "Mitchigami", a fortified village located on the eastern shore of the Door Peninsula. "Mitchigami" means "Great Lake", a term later appropriated by the Europeans. (Clifton, op.cit., p. 24-5).

1666    The French publication, Jesuits Relations, mentioned Lake Michigan as "Lake Ill-e-aouers" and "Lake Ill-i-ni-oues, as yet unexplored;" also that the Fox Indians called it "March-i-hi-gan-ing." (Hiram W. Beckwith, The Illinois and Indiana Indians, Fergus' Historical Series No. 27, Chicago, 1884, p. 165).

1667    Peace was established between the French and the Iroquois Indians, enabling the coureurs de bois to move farther west in search of furs. (Centennial History of Illinois, v. 1, The Illinois Country, 1673-1818, Clarence Walworth Alvord, (ed.), Illinois Centennial Commission, Springfield, IL., 1920, p. 58).

ca. 1668    French trader Nicholas Perrot and Jesuit Missionary Claude Allouez establish themselves among the Potawatomi. (Clifton, op.cit., p. 27).

1670    Rene Robert Cavelier de LaSalle first uses the Chicago Portage (History of Cook County Illinois, Alfred Theodore Andreas, Chicago, 1884, p. 61 / The Discovery of the Great West, Francis Parkman, Boston, Little Brown & Co., 1869, p. 21).

1671    The Miami Indian Tribe establishes new settlements at the Southern end of Lake Michigan and on the St. Joseph River (Beckwith, 1884, pp. 107-08 / Handbook of American Indians north of Mexico, Frederick Webb Hodge (ed), Rowman & Littlefield, New York, 1971, p. 852 / Andreas, op.cit., pp. 33, 46.)

June 14    At a ceremony with the Indians at Sault Saint Marie, the French claim title to the lands of the Illinois (Alvord, op.cit., p. 61 / Harry Hansen, The Chicago, Farra & Rinehart, New York, 1942, p. 28 / Illinois; A History of the Prairie State, Robert P. Howard, W.B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1972, pp. 25-6).

1673    The Jesuit missionary explorer, Jacques Marquette, and Louis Jolliet return from their voyage of exploration of the Illinois and Mississippi rivers. Their account relates their use of the Chicago portage (Andreas, op.cit., p. 46 / Hansen, op.cit., pp. 27, 29 / Illinois 68: Marking 150 Years on the Nations Frontier, Illinois Sesquicentennial Commission, 1968, p. 22 / Illinois "Prairie State", Olin Dee Morrison, V.3 Historical Atlas, 1959, p. 13 (map) / The Moving Frontier: North America seen through the eyes of its pioneer discoverers., Louis B. Wright and Elaine W. Fowler, Delacorte Press, N.Y., N.Y., 1972, p.97). The Chicago Portage National Historic Site is located near 46th Street and Harlem Avenues. It marks the western terminus of a portage over Mud Lake between the Chicago and Des Plaines Rivers and marks the low point between the Mississippi and St. Lawrence river systems. (John Husar, Chicago Tribune, Sec. 3, p. 11, November 7, 1999).

1674 - 75    Jacques Marquette spends the winter at the Chicago portage aided by courers de bois living in the area. (Alvord, op.cit., p. 67 / Andreas, op.cit., pp. 44-45/ Hansen, op.cit., p. 30 / Illinois "Prairie State", Olin Dee Morrison, V. 1 (1960), P.142 / Evanston; Its Land and its People, Viola Couch Reeling, Daughters of the American Revolution, Evanston Chapter, Evanston, IL., 1928, p. 117)

1676   (April 10)    Jesuit Missionary Claude Allouez reaches the Chicago portage on his way to replace Fr. Marquette at southern mission. He was received by about 80 Indians. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 233).

1679    Robert Coeur de La Salle, with 14 men, pass the mouth of the Chicago River. (Andreas, op.cit. p.62).

1680    Henri de Tonty, Italian adventurer and follower of La Salle, with several companions, utilize the Chicago portage in escaping the Iroquois and the fall of Ft. Crevecouer. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 63.)

ca. 1680    The Potawatomi, in response to crowded conditions in the Green Bay area, migrate southward to the Milwaukee area. (Clifton, op.cit., p. 34). This is the third migration.

1681 - 82   (December 27 - January 7)    LaSalle, Tonty and Fr. Membre pass through the Chicago area on their way to rebuild their fort on the Illinois River. (Andreas, op.cit., pp. 63-64 / Hansen, op.cit., pp. 48-49 / Morrison, V.3, op.cit., map 13).

1681 - 82    Peace was established between the French and the Iroquois Indians, enabling the coureurs de bois to move farther west in search of furs. (Alvord, op.cit., p. 58).

1684    The Wea Miami Indians are in control of the Chicago area. (History of Illinois, Rufus Blanchard, National School Furnishing Company, Chicago, 1883, p. 6).

Franquelin's map of 1684 contains the name "Chicagou". (Politics and Politicians of Chicago, Cook County and Illinois, Fremont O. Bennett, Blakely Printing Company, Chicago, 1886, p. 103.)

1685 - 92    The French, under the command of Henri de Tonty, visit Chicago on several occasions to obtain provisions. (Andreas, op.cit., 1884, p. 65 / Hansen, op.cit., 49).

1694    Approximately 1,200 Potawatomi of the Great Sea and Bear clans resettle the area located in SW Michigan along the St. Joseph River. (Clifton, op.cit., p. 34-5).

1696    The "Mission of the Guardian Angel" is established at Chicago by the French Jesuit Pierre-Francois Pinet. (Alvord, op.cit., p.104 / Howard, op.cit. p.36 / Morrison, op.cit., (1960), p. 142.)

1698    Desliettes (Pierre-Charles de Liette), a relative of Tonty, commands the French fort at Chicago. Hansen, op.cit., 49).

1699    The Reverend Jean-Francois Buisson de St. Cosme and his companions from the Seminary of Foreign Missions at Quebec, on their way to establish a southern Illinois mission, find Miami Indians at Chicago and stay a few days at the Mission of the Guardian Angel. Alvord, op.cit., pp. 115-16 / Andreas, op.cit., pp. 33, 37, 45, 66 / George D. Bushnell, Wilmette, A History, Wilmette Bicentennial Commission, Wilmette, IL., 1976, p. 51 / Reeling, op.cit. p. 36).

The London edition of Hennepin's account of La Salle's expedition is published, mentioning the word "Che-caugou." Blanchard, op.cit., p. 96).

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1700 to 1799

1700    Potawatomi Indians take control of the countryside surrounding Chicago. (Blanchard, op.cit., p. 109 / Morrison, op.cit., V.3, map, p. 8).

1702    French garrison at Chicago withdraws. (Dictionary of Canadian Biography, 1969, University of Toronto Press, V. 2, p. 435 / Hansen, op.cit., p. 49).

1712   (November 9)    Father Pierre-Gabriel Marest, writing from the mission at Kaskaskia, first spelled the lake "Michigan." (Beckwith, op.cit., p. 165).

1717    Illinois becomes part of the French colony of Louisiana. (Alvord, op.cit., p. 191 / Illinois 68, op.cit., p. 22 / Morrison, op.cit., V. 1, p. 142 / Perrin's History of Illinois, J. Nick Perrin, Illinois State Register, Springfield, IL., 1906, p. 65 / A Chronology of Illinois History, Ellen M. Whitney, Compiler, Greenwood Publishing Group, Westport, CT, reprint, 1999, p. 3).

1718    Miami Indians are driven from the countryside surrounding Chicago by the Potawatomi and Chippewa. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 33, 68 / Reeling, op,cit., p. 37).2

1755   (June 8)    French troops and their Potawatomi allies attack British forces under the command of Major General Edward Braddock near Fort Duquesne, present day Pittsburgh, PA. Forces of the Virginia militia, under the command of Col. George Washington, are defeated by the Potawatomi and French forces. (Clifton, op.cit., p. 37-8).

1759   (September 18)    British forces under the command of General Wolfe defeat French forces under the command of General Montcalm on the Plains of Abraham above Quebec City. (Morris (ed.), op.cit., p. 70).

1760    During the French and Indians War, French reinforcements pass through the Chicago area. (Alvord, op.cit., p. 242 / Morrison, V.3, op.cit., map 17).

1763    The Illinois Territory is ceded to Great Britain by France in the Treaty of Paris. (Illinois 68, op.cit., p. 22 / Morrison, op.cit., V.1, p. 142 / Perrin, op.cit., p. 7).

May    Pontiac's war against the British begins. The western tribes, including the Potawatomi, attack British forts. (Morrison, op.cit., V. 1, p. 71).

1769    Pontiac, Chief of the Ottawa Indian tribe, is murdered in Cahokia, Illinois territory. (Encyclopedia Britannica, Multimedia Edition, 1999 edition).

1773    William Murray, a subject of Great Britain and an agent of the Illinois Land Company, holds a council in Kaskaskia with the chiefs of the Illinois and is deeded two tracts of land, one of which is north of the Illinois River and extends beyond the present site of Chicago. ( Alvord, op.cit., pp. 301-02 / Andreas, op.cit., p. 69).

1774   (May 20)    The British Parliament enacts the Quebec Act which extends British rule to the Ohio River, including the Illinois territory. (Alvord, op.cit., pp. 303-06 / Morrison, op.cit., V. 1, p. 142 / Morris, op.cit., p. 83.)

1775   (April 19)    American Revolutionary War commences with the Battles of Lexington and Concord. (Morrison, op.cit., V. 1, p. 85 / Charles A. Beard, New Basic History of the United States, Doubleday, New York, 1960, p. 108).

1776   (July 4)    A Declaration of Independence is approved by the Continental Congress without dissent. It is read in Philadelphia on July 8. (Morris, ed. op.cit. pp.91-2).

1778   (February 23)    George Rogers Clark captures Vincennes, Illinois territory from British forces led by Col. Henry Hamilton. (Morris, ed. op.cit. p. 100).

July 4    Lt. Col. George Rogers Clark, of the Virginia militia, occupies Kaskaski, Illinois territory. Organizes the territory for Virginia. (Morris, ed. op.cit. p.100).

December 9    The Virginia legislature organizes the county of Illinois. (Alvord, op.cit. p. 335 / The Settlement of Illinois from 1830 to 1850, William Vipond Pooley, Bulletin of the University of Wisconsin, No. 220, Madison, WI., 1908, p. 313 / Bennett, op.cit., p. 7 / Morrison, op.cit., p. 142).

The North Branch of the Chicago River becomes known as "River Guarie" by the Indians and voyageurs because of a trader of that name who is located on the river's west bank near present day Fulton Street. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 224 / Bennett, op.cit., p.6).

1779   (July 4)    The French commander at Mackinac records that "Baptiste Pointe De Saible, a handsome negro, well educated, settled in Eschikagou; but much in the French interest." (Andreas, op.cit., 70 / Bennett, op.cit., p.5).

1780    William Murray and others reorganize the Illinois Land Company. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 69).

ca. 1780    Saugenash (translated as "English") is born to British officer William Caldwell and a Potawatomi Indian woman in Canada. He is given the English name of Billy Caldwell. (The Potawatomis, Keepers of the Fire, R. David Edmunds, University of Oklahoma Press, 1978, p. 172). He attends Jesuit schools in the Detroit area. (Edmunds, op.cit. p. 222).

1781    Potawatomi leader, Sigenak ("Blackbird"), an ally of George Rogers Clark and known to Patrick Henry, successfully attacks British positions on the St. Joseph River in southwestern Michigan. (Clifton, op.cit., p. 51).

October 19    British forces surrender to General George Washington at Yorktown, Virigina.

The Illinois Land Company petitions to cede all its land to the United States on the condition that one quarter should be reconveyed to it. The U. S. Congress denies the Company's right to the land. (Andreas, op.cit., pp. 69?70).

1783   (September 3)    Treaty of Paris is signed. The United States obtains dominion over all British territory east of the Mississippi River, including the Illinois territory. (Charles B. Johnson, Growth of Cook County, A history of the large lake-shore county. Board of Commissioners of Cook County, 1960, p. 35 / Morrison, op.cit., p. 142).

1784    Virginia cedes dominion over the Illinois territory to the Federal government. ( Morrison, op.cit., V. 1, p. 143 / Johnson, op.cit. p. 36 / Pooley, op.cit., p.313).

1785   (May 20)    The Congress of the Confederation enacts the "Basic Land Ordinance" which provided for rectangular surveys dividing the land into townships of 6 square miles. Each township was then divided into 36 sections of 640 acres each. This ordinance is the foundation of all legal descriptions used to describe real property today. The area now known as Niles Township was assigned the following description: "Township 41 North". (Morrison, op.cit., V. 1, p. 113).

1786    William Burnett, a trader located in St. Joseph, Michigan, refers to "Chicago" in correspondence to various persons. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 72).

1787   (May 25)    The Constitutional Convention, called to revise the Articles of Confederation, is called to order in Philadelphia as a quorum of 7 states is now present. George Washington is elected to be president of the Convention. (Morris, op.cit., pp. 116-17).

May 29    At the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Edmund Randolph of Virginia proposes the "Virginia Plan" of Union whose outline favors the creation of a new national government rather than mere revision to the Articles of Confederation. The matter is debated until June 13. (Morris, op.cit., p. 117).

June 11    At the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Roger Sherman of Connecticut proposes that representation in the lower house be proportional based upon population and that the upper house be composed of one vote for each state. This proposal is rejected. (Morris, op.cit., p. 117).

June 15    At the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, William Patterson of New Jersey proposes the "New Jersey" plan whose outline favors the retention of the Articles of Confederation but confers upon Congress the powers to tax and regulate foreign affairs among other changes. The issue which is debated is whether to amend the Articles of Confederation or to replace them with a new framework of government. (Morris, op.cit., p. 117).

July 12 - 16    At the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, the delegates, upon reconsideration, adopt the proposal championed by Roger Sherman of Connecticut which was previously rejected on June 11. (Morris, op.cit., p. 117).

July 13    The Congress of the Confederation enacts the "Northwest Ordinance" establishing the framework for governance of the territories north of the Ohio River, including the Illinois territory. (Morris, op.cit., p. 117 / Bennett, op.cit., p. 7 / Johnson, op.cit., p. 36 / Morrison, op.cit., p. 143).

July 19 - 23    At the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, the Delegates draft 23 "fundamental resolutions" forming a proposed outline of the new national government. The resolutions are referred to a 5 man Committee of Detail for final drafting. (Morris, op.cit., p. 119).

August 6    The Committee of Detail submits a draft of a proposed Constitution consisting of 23 articles to the Delegates for debate. (Morris, op.cit., p. 119).

August 6 - September 10    At the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, the delegates debate the merits of the proposed new Constitution. On September 8, the delegates appoint a 5 man Committee on Style and Arrangement is appointed consisting of William Johnson, Alexander Hamilton, Rufus King, James Madison and Gouverneur Morris. Morris is assigned to prepare the final draft for presentation to Congress. (Morris, op.cit., p. 119).

September 17    By a vote of 12 in favor and 0 opposed, the final Morris draft of the new Constitution is approved by the delegates.3 By terms of Article 9, it will become operative when ratified by 9 states. (Morris, op.cit., p. 119).

September 20    The Congress receives the proposed new national charter. On September 28th, it authorizes dissemination to the states for ratification. (Morris, op.cit., p. 119).

October 27    The first essay in support of ratification of the new Constitution appears in the New York newspapers. Its author is "Publius" the collective nom de plume for Alexander Hamilton (51 essays), James Madison (29 essays) and John Jay (5 essays). (Morris, op.cit., p. 119).

December 7    The State of Delaware is the first state to ratify the new federal constitution. (Morris, op.cit., p. 119).

1788   (February 7)    The Commonwealth of Massachusetts becomes the 6th state to ratify the newly proposed Constitution. Its ratifying convention proposes 9 amendments be adopted including the provision that all powers not expressly granted to the federal government be reserved to the states. (Morris, op.cit., p. 119).

June 21    The state of New Hampshire becomes the 9th state to ratify the newly proposed Constitution. It now becomes binding on the states. Twelve amendments are proposed. (Morris, op.cit., p. 120).

September 13    The last Congress under the Articles of Confederation adopts a resolution fixing New York City as the seat of the new government. (Morris, op. cit., p. 120).

1789   (February 4)    Presidential electors, pursuant to the provisions of the new federal Constitution, gather in New York City and cast votes for election of the first President of the United States. George Washington of Virginia receives 69 unanimous votes. (Morris, op.cit., p. 121).

April 30    George Washington is sworn in as the first President of the United States of America under the new federal Constitution. (Morris, op.cit.,, p. 121).

September 9    The House of Representatives recommends the adoption of 12 amendments to the federal Constitution. They are submitted to the states for ratification on September 25th. (Morris, op.cit., p. 121).

November 20    The state of New Jersey becomes the first state to ratify 10 of the 12 amendments proposed for adoption. (Morris, op.cit., p. 121).

1791   (December 15)    The previously ratified "Bill of Rights" become effective. (Morris, op.cit., p. 121).

1794   (August)    General "Mad Anthony" Wayne attacks a force of Potawatomi Indians at Fallen Timbers, near present day Toledo, Ohio. As the British are under orders not to join battle with the Americans, the Potawatomi are defeated. (Clifton, op.cit., p. 63-4).

1795   (August 3)    Treaty of Greenville (Indiana) is signed by 12 Indian Tribes, including the Potawatomi, Delaware, Miami, Seneca, Shawnee, and Wyandot. This treaty separated Indian lands from lands available for settlement by American settlers. The following described land was ceded: "one piece of land, six miles square, at the mouth of the Chicago River, emptying into the southwest end of Lake Michigan, where the fort formerly stood". (Morris, op.cit., p. 117 / Andreas, op.cit., pp. 35, 70, 79 / Beckwith, op.cit. p. 163 / Bennett, op.cit., p. 7 / Johnson, op.cit., p. 16 / Morrison, op.cit., V. 1, p. 143).

The first record of land in Niles Township owned by a non-native American appears in print. ("The World's Largest Village", Forest Emerson, Omnibus, October, 1964, V. 1, #12, pp. 22-41). 4

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1800 to 1849

1800    The Territory of Indiana, which includes the Illinois Territory, is created by Act of Congress. (Morrison, op.cit., V. 1, p. 143).

1803    (November 11)    The Corps of Discovery, led by Captains Lewis and Clark, arrive at Ft. Massac, Illinois Territory. Ft. Massac is located on the Illinois side of the Ohio River approximately 35 miles from the confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers. George Drouillard, a noted fur trapper and woodsman, is added to the team. (Lewis & Clark, Voyage of Discovery, Stephen Ambrose, National Geographic Society, 1998, p. 42).

November 28    The Corps of Discovery reaches Kaskaskia and encamps at the Army post located there. (Ambrose, op.cit., p. 43).

ca. December 4    The Corps of Discovery establishes its first winter camp on the Illinois side of the Mississippi River at the mouth of Wood River, across from the mouth of the Missouri River. (Ambrose, op.cit., p. 43 / Undaunted Courage, Stephen Ambrose, Touchstone Books, Simon & Schuster, New York, N.Y., 1996).

The Potawatomi, Sauk, Fox and Kickapoo Indians are listed by the U.S. Indian Agency as living in the area of the Chicago portage. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 86).

The schooner Tracy arrives at the port of Chicago heralding its beginning as a Great Lakes port. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 164).

Captain John Whistler, United States Army, was ordered with his company to build a fort at the Chicago portage. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 72 / Morrison, op.cit., V. 1, p. 143).

Fort Dearborn is established by elements of the United States Army. (A Chronology of Illinois History, Ellen M. Whitney, Compiler, Greenwood Publishing Group, Westport, CT, reprint, 1999, p. 4).

1804   (March 9)    The Louisiana Territory is transferred to American sovereignty at St. Louis. (Ambrose, Undaunted Courage, op.cit., p.129)

May 14    The Corps of Discovery leaves its Wood River encampment and crosses over into the Louisiana Purchase territory on its way west. (Ambrose, op.cit., p. 46).

Indian villages are located within Niles Township. (Chicago's Highways, Old and new, from Indian trail to motor road. Milo M. Quaife, D.F. Keller & Co., Chicago, 1923, map at pp. 236-37. / Reeling, op.cit., p. 55).

1809    The Illinois Territory is established by Act of Congress. Kaskaskia is designated the capital and Ninian Edwards is appointed Governor. (Whitney, op.cit., p. 4 / Bennett, op.cit., p. 11 / Morrison, op.cit., p. 143).

1812   (August 15)    The Fort Dearborn massacre retards development of the area. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 74 / Bennett, op.cit., p. 7 / Morrison, op.cit., p. 143).

"Skokey Marsh" first appears on General William F. Hull's map dtd 1812. (Indian Place Names in Illinois, Virgil J. Vogel, Illinois State Historical Society, Pamphlet Series, No. 4, Springfield, 1963, p. 140).

The population of the Potawatomi Indian tribe reaches approximately 12,000. (Clifton, op.cit., p. 34). They massacre 52 troops and civilians at Fort Dearborn. (Whitney, op.cit., p. 5).

1813   (October 5)    Potawatomi forces under the leadership of Tecumseh, a Shawnee chief, are defeated by United States forces at Moraviantown, Ontario, Canada. The western tribes are no longer able to resist American expansion westward. (Clifton, op.cit., p. 58).

Potawatomi tribal lands extend from the Detroit / Lake St. Clair area on the east to the eastern shore of the Mississippi River on the west, to Door County, Wisconsin on the north. (See Map, Clifton, op.cit., p. 58).

1816    By the Treaty of St. Louis, the Potawatomi, Ottawa and Chippewa Indians cede land to the United States, including portions of what will become Niles Township. (Andreas, op.cit., p.83 / Illinois in 1818. Solon Justice Buck, Contained in the "Centennial History of Illinois" published by the Illinois Centennial Commission in 1920, p.385 / Setting down the Record: A History of Skokie, Bertha Rosche, 1949, p.2).6

The United States government rebuilds Fort Dearborn and re-establishes the United States Factory so that fur trading is again feasible in the Chicago area. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 92 / Bennett, op.cit., p. 8 / Morrison, op.cit., p. 143).

1818    Illinois is admitted to the Union as the 21st state. (Whitney, op.cit., p. 5 / Bennett, op.cit., p. 11 / Illinois 68, op.cit., p. 22 / Morrison, op.cit., p. 143).

The Potawatomi, the predominant tribe of the northern Chicago area, including Niles Township, number approximately 4,800 in the state. (Buck, op.cit., 1917-20, pp. 2-3).

The first steamboat, Walk-in-the-Water, sails the Great Lakes, bringing mechanization to Great Lakes trade. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 164 / Howard, op.cit., p. 105).

1821    The Indians cede to the United States a great part of what are now the northern suburbs of Chicago. (Beckwith, op.cit., pp. 163, 175 / Illinois; a Descriptive and Historical Guide, 1974, p. 179 / Rosche, op.cit., p. 2)

1825    Saugenash a/k/a Billy Caldwell is appointed a Justice of the Peace in Chicago. (Edmunds, op.cit., p. 228).

1829    Treaty of Prairie du Chien is signed. Potawatomi leaders Shabbona, Saugenash and Chechepinqua receive allotments of land. Saugenash, a\k\a Billy Caldwell, the son of an English father and Potawatomi mother, receives 2 1/2 sections of land or 1,600 acres located in the S 1/2 of Sections 31, 32 and 33 in Niles Township. Victoire Pothier receives section of land above that received by Caldwell; Jane Miranda receives 1/4 section of land above that received by Pothier. (Historic Illinois from the Air, David Buisseret, The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1990, pp. 24-5, 120-21; See Map, p. 121 / Indian Affairs. Laws and Treaties, Charles J. Kappler (ed.), GPO, 1903 v. 2, pp. 213-15 / Andreas, op.cit., p. 109 / Bushnell, op.cit., p. 10 / Vogel, op.cit., pp. 16, 17).

1830    (March)    Abraham Lincoln, accompanied by his Father, step-mother and siblings, arrives in Illinois for the first time. (Whitney, op.cit., 6).

Congress enacts the Removal Bill requiring that all Indian tribes east of the Mississippi relocate west of the Mississippi. (Morris, op.cit. p. 426).

1831   (Spring)    Joseph Curtis7 erects a log house near the north branch of the Chicago River in the NW 1/4 of Section 17 of Niles Township. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 470 / Niles Township, E. Palma Beaudette, 1916, p. 66 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, pp. 24, 46, 67 / Rosche, op.cit., ch. 2).

January 15    Cook County is organized and named for Daniel P. Cook. (Counties of Illinois, 1982, p. 60 / Morrison, op.cit., V. 1, p. 145 / Perrin, op.cit., p. 134).

1832   (Spring)    John Dewes settles in the SW 1/4 of Section 8 in Niles Township. The west fork of the north branch of the Chicago River runs through his property. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 470).

The Black War ends with Sauk and Fox Indians leaving Illinois. (Whitney, op.cit., p. 6).

1833   (March 3)    The City of Chicago is incorporated. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 128 / Morrison, op.cit., V. 1, p. 145 / Pooley, op.cit., 1908, p. 478).

September 26    Treaty of Chicago is signed by the Potawatomi of Southern Wisconsin and Northern Illinois assuring their relocation to reservations west of the Mississippi River in Iowa, Missouri and Kansas. The Fourth migration. The Potawatomi presence in Niles Township, except for those of mixed European and Potawatomi blood, ends. (Clifton, op.cit., p. 66 / See Map, p. 67 / Andreas, op.cit., pp. 123-128 / Federal Writers' Project, Illinois, Illinois, A Descriptive and Historical Guide, 1947, p. 21 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 73 / Morrison, op.cit., p. 145 / Pooley, op.cit., p. 391). Schedule A of said Treaty recites the identities of certain individuals who are to receive cash compensation in lieu of "reservations"; among them are:

  • Victoire Porthier and her children - $700.00
  • Jane Miranda - $200.00
  • Billy Caldwell's children - $600.00
  • Billy Caldwell - $5,000.00

Schedule B of said Treaty recites that Joseph Curtis is to receive $50.00 in satisfaction of his claim against the Potawatomi tribe which the tribe admitted to be due. (Kappler, op.cit., v. 2, pp. 296-303).

Thomas Jefferson, Sr. locates his homestead in the S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of Section 17 in Niles Township. The north branch of the Chicago River runs through his property. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 470).

William Clark erects a log house near the north branch of the Chicago River in the N 1/2 of Section 30 in Niles Township. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 470).

The United States Congress grants the first appropriations to begin significant improvements to Chicago's harbor; improved facilities will enable Chicago to become the focus of the settlement of northeastern Illinois. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 160).

1834    John Jackson Ruland lands on lakeshore near Evanston, moves inland and settles on the border between the southern halves of Sections 29 and 30 in Niles Township. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 470 / David Buisseret, Skokie, A Community History Using Old Maps, Skokie Historical Society, Skokie, IL., 1985 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 46 / Rosche, op.cit., ch. 2 / Villager, May 22, 1958, p. 20).

John Miller erects a sawmill at the north branch of the Chicago River near its intersection with present day Lincoln Avenue, Morton Grove, in the SE 1/4 of Section 18 in Niles Township. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 470 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 68).

Christian Ebbinger and spouse settle on lands located in the SW 1/4 of Section 29 and N of Section 31 in Niles Township and on property located in the Billy Caldwell preserve. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 470). The beginnings of the settlement known as Dutchman's Point.

Christian Ebbinger's brother, John Ebbinger, locates on property south of Christian. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 470).

Christian & John Ebbinger's brother, Frederick Ebbinger, locates on property south of John. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 470).

John Plank marries Miss Elizabeth Ebbinger and they settle on property north of Christian Ebbinger in Section 31 in Niles Township. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 470).

John Odel settles on land located in the SW 1/4 of Section 30 in Niles Township. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 470).

Elan Crane settles on land located in the S of Section 18 in Niles Township. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 470).

1835   (September)    The Potawatomi Indians, under the leadership of Billy Caldwell, leave Chicago for the last time; they begin their trek west to the Platte country of northwest Missouri, Iowa and the Oklahoma territory. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 128 / Edmunds, op.cit. p. 250).

United States land office begins operations to serve the Chicago area, enabling squatters to claim legal title to land. (Morrison, op.cit., map. 70) Land in Niles Township cost $1.25 an acre. (Early Skokie, League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, 1976).

1836    James Wheldon settles on land located in the SE 1/4 of Section 19 in Niles Township. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 470).

George Heslington settles on land located in the W of Section 7 in Niles Township. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 470).

Mail is delivered to Dutchman's Point. (Bushnell, op.cit., pp. 18, 20).

Work starts on the Galena and Chicago Union Railroad, the first railroad chartered out of Chicago. It is a forerunner of all the lines which are to make the Chicago area a major rail terminus. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 167).

The Illinois and Michigan Canal project is begun. (Whitney, op.cit., p. 6).

1837    Benjamin Emerson settles on land located in the NE 1/4 of Section 14 in Niles Township. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 470).

Mr. Bartlette and his Indian wife settle on land located in the NW 1/4 of Section 35 in Niles Township. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 470).

The North Branch Hotel was built in what is now Niles by Benjamin Hall and John Marshall. (History of Niles, Illinois, Dorothy C. Tyse, Niles, IL., 1974, p. 10 / Villager, June 5, 1958, p. 16).

Abraham Lincoln moves to Springfield, Illinois from New Salem. (Encyclopedia Brittanica, Multimedia Edition, 1999).

1838    The first school is built in the SW 1/4 of Section 30 in Niles Township near the present intersection of Harlem and Touhy avenues. Four children from the Ebbinger and Ruland families are taught by a Scotsman named Ballantine. (Life, January 17, 1963, Section 3, p. 16 / Villager, June 5, 1968, p. 16).

1839    John O'Brien erects a log cabin on the property located on the NE corner of present day Oakton Street and Niles Avenue. This property was subsequently owned by Peter Blameuser II. The pond on this property supplied the water which doused the fire of 1910. It was this fire which consumed several buildings north of present day Oakton Street on the west side of Lincoln Avenue. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 471 / Richard Whittingham, Skokie, A Centennial History, Village of Skokie, Skokie, IL., 1988, p. 19 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 68, 132 / Life, Skokie, Section 3, Jan. 17, 1963, pp. 59, 73*).

Springfield becomes the capital of Illinois. (Whitney, op.cit., p. 6).

1840    Jacob Comstock settles on property located in the N of Section 15 in Niles Township. This property was subsequently owned by the Abbink family. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 471).

Stephen Gage settles on property located in the N of Section 7 in Niles Township. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 471.)

The first tavern is built in Dutchman's Point by Benjamin Hall and John Marshall. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 471).

1843    Jacob Kercher settles on property located in the Section 14 in Niles Township. (Andreas, op. cit., p. 471).

Sylvester Beckwith settles on property located in the NE 1/4 of Section 18 in Niles Township. (Andreas, op. cit., p. 471).

November 26    The Catholic Diocese of Chicago is established. (St. Peter Catholic Church, David Buisseret, Rosemary Schmitt, Richard J. Witry, 1994, p. 84). 8

1845    Wolfgang Harrer and his two sons, Michael & Henry, settle on property located "on the east prairie near the edge of the forest." (Andreas, op.cit., p. 471).

1846    Chicago was made an official port of entry for the United States. (Morrison, op.cit., p. 147).

ca. 1847    A log cabin is constructed just northwest of the intersection of Lincoln and Gross Point Road, which is believed to be the original home of Nicholas and Elizabeth Meyer, early Niles Township settlers. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 132 / Rosche, op.cit., ch. 2 / League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p.1 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, pp. 53, 59 / "Characteristics of Housing", Skokie, Illinois. Department of Community Development. Planning Section, 1964, p. 1).

The Chicago Tribune is founded by Joseph Medill. (Whitney, op.cit., p. 7).

1848    Ernst Galitz arrives from Pomerania and George Gabel arrives from Wittenberg, Germany. (Undated Newspaper articles, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

The first boat passes through the Illinois and Michigan Canal as the Canal is formally opened, greatly enlarging the markets for Chicago area producers. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 153 / Morrison, op.cit., p. 147).

1849    Samuel Meyer9 , storekeeper and Village trustee for many years, was born to Nicholas Meyer in the cabin located in Section 21 in what was to become Niles Center. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 477 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 55 / Villager, June 5, 1958, p. 16).

The second school in Niles Township, located at Milwaukee and Harlem, was built by John Ketchum for $25.00 using donated land and materials. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 55 / Villager, June 5, 1958, p. 16)

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1850 to 1899

1850   (April 2)    The government of Niles Township is organized with a population of 408. Andreas reports that the name "Niles" was selected at a public meeting held prior to this organizational meeting but that no account exists as to why the name Niles was selected. (Andreas, op.cit., pp. 341, 471 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 125 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 55 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 3 / "Characteristics of Housing", Skokie, Illinois. Department of Community Development. Planning Section, 1964, p. 1 / Tyse, op.cit., p. 10 / Villager, June 5, 1958, p. 16).

  • Samuel E. Ferris is chosen the 1st Supervisor of Niles Township.
  • Pierpont Anderson is chosen Clerk and Collector.
  • Christian Ebbinger is chosen Assessor and Overseer of the Poor.
  • Samuel E. Ferris, Nathaniel Snell and Robert Robinson are chosen Commissioners of Highways.
  • Robert Pink and Charles W. Buler are chosen Justices of the Peace.
  • Hamlet B. Snell and Pierpont Anderson are chosen Constables.

Five road districts were created and overseers were appointed as follows:

  • James Wheldon for Road District No. 1
  • Hamlet B. Snell for Road District No. 2
  • Alvin Cooley for Road District No. 3
  • Samuel Rohr for Road District No. 4
  • Adam Huffmeyer for Road District No. 5 (Andreas, op.cit., p. 471)

1851   (April 2)    Election meeting held at the North Branch Hotel. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 471).

  • Samuel Anderson is elected the 2nd Supervisor of Niles Township.
  • John Ketchum is elected Clerk.
  • Samuel E. Ferris is elected Assessor and Collector.
  • Christian Ebbinger is chosen Assessor and Overseer of the Poor.
  • Pierpont Anderson and Hamlet B. Snell are elected Constables.
  • Samuel E. Ferris, Robert Hartt and Adam Huffmeyer are chosen Commissioners of Highways.
  • Robert Hartt is chosen Justice of the Peace.

June 19    Election meeting held at the North Branch Hotel. John M. Wilson is elected as a Judge of the County Court of Common Pleas to fill the vacancy created by the death of Giles Spring. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 471).

December 15    An election is held to fill the Supervisor vacancy caused by the resignation of Samuel Anderson who moved to California. John Gray is elected. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 471).

December 18    Samuel Ferris resigns the Collector position. Rodney E. Day is appointed to fill the vacancy. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 471).

1852   (April)    John Gray is elected as Supervisor of Niles Township10. (Andreas, op. cit., p. 471).

Michael Harrer, the Village's first butcher, left Niles Township and went to California by way of the Isthmus of Panama. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 476 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 74).

1854    Gustave Schraeder purchases fifty-four acres of land straddling the border of Sections 27 and 28 south of present day Howard Street. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 477 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 52).

John Ahrens, early township official, purchases a farm of one hundred acres in Niles Township. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 475 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 52 / Rosche, op.cit., ch. 2).

The Chicago, St. Paul and Fond du Lac Railroad is established. It later becomes the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad and lays a branch line through Niles Centre. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 179).

December    Heinrich "Henry" Harms , an immigrant from Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Prussia, migrates to Niles Township and settles on land located at the present day intersection of Lincoln and Oakton streets in Section 28 in Niles Township. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 474 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 132 / Life, Skokie, Section 3, Jan. 17, 1963, p. 38 / "Characteristics of Housing", Skokie, Illinois. Department of Community Development. Planning Section, 1964, p. 10 / Villager, May 29, 1968, p. 17 / Rosche, op.cit., Chapter 4 p. 10).11

1855    Henry Harms marries Louisa Nicholas. They have 11 children. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 476).

Michael Harrer returned to Niles Township from California to farm. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 476 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 74).

1856    The Rand McNally Company is established in Chicago. (Whitney, op.cit., p. 8). It relocates to Skokie in 1952.

1857    Peter Bergmann12, Niles Centre merchant, builds the second permanent home in the future Niles Centre.13 (Andreas, op.cit., p. 474 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 25 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 50 / "Characteristics of Housing", Skokie, Illinois. Department of Community Development. Planning Section, 1964, p. 1).

Amos J. Snell, "Toll Gate King" and timber millionaire, builds a log house on the NE 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of section 28. (Andreas, op.cit. pp. 474, 483 / Beaudette, op.cit. p. 25 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 50 / News (Skokie), July 22, 1976, p. 18 / Emerson, op.cit., (Omnibus), p. 25 / Skokie, Illinois. Department of Community Development, Planning Section, 1964, p. 1).

Carl Breitzmann14 builds a blacksmith shop in Niles Centre. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 474 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 25* / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 50 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 3 / Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 25).

George Kay builds a 24' by 24' two-story brick house in what is to become Niles Center. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 474 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 25 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 50).

1858    The first school in the area of Niles Centre opens: a one-story frame building located at Howard and Niles Center Road and known as the Fairview School. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 474 / League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p.4 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, pp. 50, 55 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 3 / Villager, June 5, 1958, p. 16).

Henry Harms opens the first store (hardware and provisions) at the SE corner of present day Lincoln and Oakton. (Whittingham, op.cit.,p. 24 / Andreas, op.cit., p. 474 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 25 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 50 / "Characteristics of Housing", Skokie, Illinois. Department of Community Development. Planning Section, 1964, p. 1 / Skokie, Illinois. Department of Community Development, Planning Section, 1964, p. 2).15

1859    The following are noted among the dwellers in Niles Township:

  • John Ahrens (Prussia)
  • Peter Bergmann, Carl Breitzmann
  • John Dilg (Mecklenburg)
  • Charles Harms (Mecklenburg)
  • Henry Harms (Mecklenburg)
  • Mother Harms (Mecklenburg)
  • George Kay
  • Edward Meier
  • John Melzer (Bavaria)
  • Gustave Schraeder (Mecklenburg)
  • Johann Tess (Mecklenburg)
  • John Theobald
  • Mr. and Mrs. Wagner and son Herman

(Andreas, op.cit., pp. 474-477* / Beaudette, op.cit., pp. 28, 107, 132* / League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 3 / Life (Skokie)*, sec. 3, January 17, 1963, pp. 20, 50, 52, 72 / News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 89 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 3 /Niles Center Press, January 2, 1931, p. 1/ Skokie Review, March 19, 1958, p. 23 / Villager, May 29, 1958, pp. 17-18).

1860    Niles Township teacher's salaries were $51.00 a month for the head teacher, Mrs. Hinman, and $25.00 a month for her assistant, Mrs. Langdon. (Villager, June 5, 1958, p. 16).

Population of Niles Township is 1,346. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 341).

November    Abraham Lincoln, of Springfield, Illinois, is elected the 16th President of the United States. (Whitney, op.cit., p. 8).

Elston Road existed in the western part of Niles Township. (Quaife, op.cit., p. 107).

1861   (April 12)    South Carolina militia, under the command of Gen. Pierre G.T. Beauregard, opens fire on Ft. Sumter under the command of Major Anderson. The American Civil War begins. (Morris, op.cit. p. 230).

ca. 1862    Peter Bergmann establishes a general provisions store at the northwest corner of present day Lincoln and Oakton. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 474).

Henry Harms establishes a store in the front of his second house on the southwest corner of Lincoln and Oakton. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 474 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 25 / League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 3 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 50 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 3 / Whittingham, op.cit., p. 26). See fn. 12.

1863    Albert J. Harms, early greenhouse operator and son of Henry Harms, was born in Niles Centre. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 476).

February 10    The original post office is established and is located in Henry Harms' store. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 474 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, pp. 3, 10* / Post Office Department Regional Office,** National Archives Microfilm: May 23, 1980).

1864    George Klehm, county official, moves to Niles Centre. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 476 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 16 / League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 5).

George Klehm marries Eliza Harms, sister of Henry Harms. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 476).

July 4    The draft call for the Civil War lists the Niles District as responsible for a quota of twenty-two men out of 209 enrolled. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 221).

November    Abraham Lincoln of Springfield, Illinois, is re-elected President of the United States. (Whitney, op.cit., p. 8).

1865    Peter Blameuser II16 comes to Niles Centre after living in the west, establishes a clothing store, and buys and develops 185 acres in Niles Township. (Andreas, op.cit., pp. 475, 476 / League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 8 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 20 / Rosche, op.cit., ch. 5).

1866    Henry Harms builds a plank road up Lincoln Avenue, with five toll gates, which terminates at Niles Centre. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 131 / League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p.3).

1867   (May 5)    Thirty-five families organize St. Peter's Evangelical Lutheran Church on land donated by Peter and Magdalena Heinz Blameuser. The Church is named after Peter Blameuser's patron saint. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 475 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 21 / League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p.8* / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 76 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 3, 96 / Rosche, op.cit., ch. 6 / Festschrift zum funfzig-ahrigen Jubilarum, 1868-1918, Evng. Luth. St. Petri Gemeinde, Niles Center, Illinois, 1918, p. 9 / Whittingham, op.cit. p. 142).

Peter Bergmann sells his store to Peter Blameuser II. Blameuser sells the dry goods business but retains the saloon business. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 474).

Peter and Magdalena Heinz Blameuser (link to Blameuser Family Photograph) donate 4.72 acres of land located in Section 21 of Niles Township to the Catholic Archbishop of Chicago for purposes of establishing a Catholic parish on the site. (Buisseret et.al. op.cit., pp. 3, 84).

Eberhardt Blameuser, Peter II's brother, donates an additional 1 acre of land to round out the cemetery. (Buisseret et.al. op.cit., pp. 3, 84).

December 18    A bounty tax of 3% was levied by Niles Township to repay disgruntled subscribers to the draft fund for the Civil War. (Andreas, op.cit., pp. 472-73 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 131).

1868    Henry Harms sells his store to his brother-in-law, George C. Klehm . (League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p.3 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 20 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 21).

St. Peter's German Evangelical Lutheran Church erects a building and starts a school on the land previously donated by Peter Blameuser. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 475 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 21 / Festschrift zum funfzig-jahrigen Jubilarum, 1868-1918, Evng. Luth. St. Petri Gemeinde, Niles Center, Illinois, 1918, p. 9 / League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, p. 8* / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 76 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, pp. 3, 96).

1869   (May 6)    The first mass is celebrated at St. Peter Catholic Church by Rev. Joseph Beincke in the new church which measures 40' x 60' and was constructed at a cost of $3,536.00. (Buisseret et.al., op.cit., pp. 3, 84).

Henry Harms built his third residence at 5319 Oakton. (League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p.3 / Whittingham, op.cit. p. 26).

Some of the Niles Township settlers who arrived during the 1860's are:

  • Berg Family (Hamberg, Germany)
  • Ernest Galitz (Pomerania)
  • John Fluger (Michigan)
  • George C. Klehm (Hesse-Darmstadt)
  • Peter Blameuser II, (Prussia)
  • Rev. & Mrs. William Kolb and son, John Franz & son Jacob
  • Mr. & Mrs. John Koller, (Birkenfeld)
  • Ivan Paroubek (Bohemia)

(Andreas, op.cit., pp. 445-477 / Beaudette, op.cit., pp. 16, 27, 28, 53, 59 League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., pp.5, 8 Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, pp. 20, 72 / News (Skokie), December 17, 1943, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, January 13, 1933, p. 1 Rosche, 1949, ch. 2 / Villager, May 29, 1958, pp. 17-18).

1870    Amelia Louise Klehm, who was to be one of the country's first women doctors, is born. (League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 9 / Whittingham, op.cit., p. 48).

Population of Niles Township is 1,791. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 341).

1871   (October)    The Chicago fire rages. It burns all of the real property records, including properties in Niles Township, recorded prior thereto.

Dr. Theodore Hoffman, the Township's first resident doctor, returns to practice in Niles Township because of the fire. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 476 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 145 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 72).

1872    The equalized value of all Niles Township real estate is pegged at $138,320.00. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 342).

The trunk line of the St. Paul Railroad, later renamed the Milwaukee Road, is laid through Niles and Morton Grove. Cutting timber to feed the steam engines clears the land for farming. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, pp. 21, 55 / Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 25 / Villager, July 3, 1958, p. 13).

1873    The first English speaking church in Niles Township is founded by the Methodists. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 55 / Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 25 / Whittingham, op.cit., 30).

John W. Brown, mayor of Niles Center and grocery/dry goods merchant, came to the Village as a school teacher at its first two-room school house on Carpenter and Howard. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 476 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 5 / Rosche, op.cit., p. 5*).

The parishioners of St. Peter Catholic Church erect a school building at the base of the "V". In 1893, it is relocated further north to make way for the construction of the present church building. (Buisseret et.al., op.cit., pp. 3, 85 / Andreas, op.cit., p. 475 / Beaudette, op.cit. p. 25 / Rosche, op.cit., p. 6).

George H. Klehm, civic leader and son of George C., was born in Niles Centre. News (Skokie), May 20, 1932, p. 1 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 5).

1874    The first greenhouse in Niles Centre is started by Stielow and Kusky. This is the first major industry in Niles Center. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 475 / Beaudette, op.cit. pp. 104-115 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 50 / Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 25 / Rosche, op.cit., p. 7*).

August Siegel, pioneer musician and cigar manufacturer, comes to Niles Centre. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 30).

Michael Harrer starts a meat market on Main Street (Lincoln Avenue) in Niles Center. The building still stands at 8051 Lincoln Avenue and is the John Haben family home. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 476 / League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p.15 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 74).

1875    Henry Harms is awarded a contract for work on the Chicago Courthouse which causes a protracted lawsuit, which was settled in 1883. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 476 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 132 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 38 / Bennett, op.cit., pp. 377-78* / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 16).

1876    Alma Elizabeth Klehm, pioneer schoolteacher, is born. (League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p.10 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 47).

Peter Blameuser II purchases a building at the northwest corner of Lincoln and Oakton. (League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p.8 / Luxembourg Brotherhood of America, 1887 - 1987, Richard J. Witry, Chicago, 1987.)

August 30    The Dominican Sisters of Racine, Wisconsin, come to Niles Centre and assume the teaching duties at St. Peter Catholic School. (Buisseret et.al., op.cit., pp. 3, 85). 17

1878    Henry Harrer starts a store and saloon in Niles Center. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 476 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 72).

St. Peter Evangelical Lutheran Church purchases 3 acres on present day Harms Rd. for cemetery purposes. (Our Heritage Rings for Progress, St. Peter Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1981).

1879   (March 14)    Albert Einstein is born in Ulm, Germany. (Encyclopedia Britannica, Multimedia Edition, 1999).

A great flood on the North Branch of the Chicago River wrecks all the bridges except the Beckwith Bridge on Church Street. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 16).

Some of the Niles Township settlers who arrived during the 1870's are:

  • John W. Brown
  • George Busscher (Holland)
  • David Fielweber (Lake County, Illinois)
  • Frank J. Gabriel (Berlin)
  • Henry Heinz(Germany)
  • Jacob Heinz (Germany)
  • Mrs. Mary Hoffman (Germany)
  • Charles Langfeld
  • George Lohrmann
  • Dr. M. H. Luken
  • August Siegel (Prussia)
  • Gottfried & Minni Springer
  • Frederick Stielow (Prussia)
  • Peter Thorsen (Denmark)
  • Mrs. Fredericka Voth (Germany)

(Andreas, op.cit., pp. 476, 477 / Beaudette, op.cit., pp. 25, 27, 28, 30, 60, 137 / Life (Skokie)*, sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 72 / News (Skokie), August 18, 1955, p. 1 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 5 / Niles Center Press, March 24, 1933, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, August 6, 1937, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, August 5, 1938, p. 1 / Rosche, op,cit., p. 5).

1880    The Niles Center Public Market, the "Farmer's Market", opens on the first Tuesday and third Thursday of each month. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 21 / League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 13 / Life (Skokie)*, sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 70 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 3).

Population of Niles Township is 2,503. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 342).

1881   (February)    St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church and school is started, averaging an attendance of 80 pupils for the first three years. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 475 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 21). Rev. Frederick Detzer is the first Pastor. (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 143 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 21, 25 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 76).

Samuel Meyer and John W. Brown form a partnership and purchase the dry goods and grocery business from George C. Klehm. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 476 / League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 5 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 53*).

George C. Klehm, pioneer public official, is elected to the Cook County Board of Commissioners. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 20).

May 6    The Niles Centre Volunteer Fire Company is organized. It is later incorporated on October 21, 1884. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 19 / League of Women Voters of SkokieLincolnwood, op.cit., p. 19 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 26 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 21 / Rosche, op.cit., p. 7 / Villager, June 19, 1958, p. 16).

August    St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church erected a building of two stories, 32 by 50 feet. Rev. Frederick Detzer succeeded his father, Adam, to the pulpit, where he would serve for fifty years. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 475 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 25 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 61).

1882    A flood on the North Branch of the Chicago River sweeps away the Dempster street, Oakton street, Church and Hart's Rd. bridges in Niles Township. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 131).

Ice cream is sold to the community by peddlers in wagons for three cents a dish (the buyer supplied the dish). (League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 4 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 34 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 42 / Villager, June 19, 1958, p. 17 / Whittingham, op.cit., p. 38).

1883    Medard M. Gabel opens Niles Centre's first hardware store at 8122 Lincoln. (League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 11 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 49).

Henry Harms is awarded damages for unpaid construction costs incurred by him in constructing the foundation and sub-basement of the Chicago Courthouse. (Andreas, op.cit. p. 476 / Bennett, op.cit. pp. 377, 378* / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 38 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 16).

Census of school children in Niles Township:

  • District 1: 394
  • District 2: 206
  • District 3: 218
  • District 4: 425
  • District 5: 277

Total 1,520

(Beaudette, op.cit., p. 87).

1884    Niles Center contains:

  • 250 people
  • 2 meat markets
  • 2 blacksmith shops
  • 3 greenhouses
  • 5 stores
  • 1 school
  • 3 churches
  • 6 saloons

(Andreas, 1884, p. 475 / League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 12* / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 57* / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 42 / Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 25).

Evanston church members start the first English speaking Sunday school in Niles Centre, using the Fairview School. (Life (Skokie)*, sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 52).

Oakton Street is known as Harms Avenue; Lincoln Avenue is known as Miller's Mill Road. (League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., pp. 5, 10* / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 72).

Niles Township contains nearly 3,000 people, 5 public schools, 3 private schools, and 6 churches. (Andreas, op.cit., p. 471).

October 21    The Niles Centre Volunteer Fire Company, previously organized on May 6, 1881, is incorporated. Its members are:

Karl Arnou

    

Peter Blameuser, Sr.

    

Peter Blameuser, Jr.

George Busscher

    

Adam Dotzaner

    

Carl Furth

Medard M. Gabel

    

William J. Galitz

    

Charles Galitz

Conrad Groh

    

Edwin Harms

    

Albert Harms

Adam Harrer

    

Carl Harrer

    

John Kenning

George C. Klehm

    

Charles Kunstmann

    

George Lohrmann

Ludwig Luebbers

    

Otto Maylander

    

Jacob Meyer

Samuel Meyer

    

Fritz Neitz

    

Ivan Paroubek

Henry Remke

    

Fritz Rose

    

John Rueschy

William Scherer

    

Herman Schiller

    

Andrew Schmitz

August Siegel

    

Frederick Stielow

    

Peter Theobald

Carl Theobald

    

Frank Wagner

    

Henry Wriedt

(Beaudette, op.cit., p. 19).

1885    Baumhardt's blacksmith shop is located at the Northwest corner of present day Galitz Street and Lincoln Avenue. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 5).

The first telephone is installed in Niles Township: a toll station which cost 25 cents a call. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 78*).

1886    Hermann Gerhardt came to Niles Center and started a blacksmith shop. (Rosche, op.cit., ch. 2).

A "toll station" is established in Henry Harms' home. This is the first telephone in Niles Centre. ("Skokie and the Telephone", Illinois Bell Telephone, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

1887    The Engine House at 8031 Floral Avenue is constructed to house the Volunteer Fire Company. It is used as a working Fire House until 1969. It also served as the Village Hall. The upper floor meeting room was home to the Plattdeutsch Guild, the German Singing Club, The Catholic Order of Foresters (photograph of Foresters stationery), and several others. (Whittingham, op.cit. p. 46 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 21 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, pp. 5, 26 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 24).

St. Peter Evangelical Lutheran Church adds a bell tower and two bells to its first church building. (Our Family Album, St. Peter's United Church of Christ, Skokie, IL., 1978 / Beaudette, op.cit., p. 21 / Festschrift zum funfzig-jahrigen Jubilarum, 1868-1918, Evng. Luth. St. Petri Gemeinde, Niles Center, Illinois, 1918, p.11 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, pp. 20, 76 / News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 40).

1888   (February 16)    A Judge of the County Court of Cook County enters an order requiring that an election be held on March 6, 1888 at the Engine House in Niles Center to determine whether the citizens therein wish to officially incorporate as a village. (Cert. Copy of Court Order dtd March 8, 1888, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

March 6    At an election held at the Engine House on Floral Avenue, 41 voters vote in favor of incorporating as the Village of Niles Centre, 17 votes against. (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 46 / Cert. Copy of Court Order dtd March 8, 1888, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

April 3    Elections are held to select the Village's first officials. Adam Harrer defeats Herman Schiller and is elected as the Village of Niles Centre's 1st President.18 (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 46 / Cert. Copy of Court Order dtd March 8, 1888, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

April 23    First Village officials are sworn in. (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 49)

May 8    The first Village ordinances are enacted. (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 49)19

May 18    Certified Copies of the Court orders reflecting the results of the elections to incorporate and elect village officials are filed with the Illinois Secretary of State. (Cert. Copy of Court Order dtd March 8, 1888, Archives, Skokie Historical Society). 20

Amos Snell, the "Toll Gate King" and timber millionaire, is murdered. (Chicago Daily News, May 20, 1944, p. 3 / Charles Winslow, Biographical Sketches of Chicagoans, Bound transcript in Chicago Public Library, 1948, p. 2443 / Sunday Life (Skokie),* sec. 1-A, January 17, 1971, p. 8 / Villager, June 12, 1958, p. 16).

Floral Avenue is known as Back Street and Lincoln Avenue as Front Street. (League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 5).

1889    Some settlers who arrived in this decade are:

  • Fred Beisswanger (Germany)
  • Henry Pfeiffer (Germany)
  • Mr. & Mrs. Fritz Brei, (Warskenhagen)
  • Julianna Pfeiffer, nee Strohwald, (Przybislew)
  • John L. Calef
  • Adolph H. Poehlmann
  • Hermann Gerhardt (Pomerania)
  • Carl & Louisa Hagen Rohde (Mecklenburg)
  • Mrs. Fredericka Hartig
  • Jacob Hohs, Sr., (Luxembourg)
  • William Teegan (Hamburg)
  • Henry Loutsch
  • Joseph Webber
  • John S. Niemann (Denmark)
  • August & Maria Weigt (Germany)

(Beaudette, op.cit., pp. 60, 137, 141 / Niles Center Press, February 13, 1931, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, April 3, 1931; p. 1 / Niles Center Press, October 16, 1931, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, November 18, 1932, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, February 1, 1933, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, January 5, 1934, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, January 22, 1937, p. 1 / Rosche, op.cit., p. 7 / Skokie Press, September 21, 1945, p. 1).

1890   (April)    John W. Brown is elected Niles Centre's 2nd Village President. (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 112.)

April 28    Farmers disguised as Indians make a surprise attack on the toll booth at Milwaukee and Fullerton, burning it and the keeper's house to the ground. This booth, on the Northwest Plank Road, now Milwaukee Avenue, served traffic to Niles Township. (Sunday Life (Skokie),* sec. 1-A, January 17, 1971, p. 8 / Villager, June 12, 1958, pp. 16-17).

Cook County bought the Milwaukee Avenue and Lincoln Avenue toll rights and operated the roads toll free. This action was motivated by the murder of Amos Snell. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 17 / Sunday Life (Skokie),* sec. 1-A, January 17, 1971, p. 8 / Villager, June 12, 1958, p. 17).

George H. Klehm joins his father and brother Edwin in running the general store at Lincoln and Oakton. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 1 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 5).

1891   (October)    The Chicago telephone directory changes its listing from Niles Centre to Niles Center. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p.17).

1892    The Village president's salary is $19.50 a year; the treasurer receives $25.00. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p.3).

John Joeson owns the first motor car in the Village. Henry Heinz owns the second. (League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 19).

1893  (August)    The School Sisters of St. Francis of Milwaukee, Wi., arrive at St. Peter Catholic School to begin teaching duties. They will remain a fixture at St. Peter until 1999, when the last nun leaves the parish school. (Buisseret et.al., op.cit., p. 13, 87).21

Robert E. Siegal, son of August, starts business in Niles Center as a barber. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 30).

1895    The Village of Morton Grove is incorporated. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 45 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 64).

The Harrer family donates land for a two room school house located at present day Howard Street and East Prairie Road. (The History of East Prairie School, Archives, Skokie Historical Society, 1983.44.14).

April    Peter Blameuser III is elected the 3rd President of the Village Board. (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 113).

1896   (September 5)    The following area is delineated as a School District for Niles Centre: N 80 A of the E1/2 of Sec. 29, N 160 A of Sec. 28, the NW 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of Sec. 27, the W 160 A of Sec. 22, the S of Sec. 21, the 280 E A of the N1/2 of Sec. 21, the SE 1/4 of Sec. 20, the E 280 A of the S of Sec. 16 and the W 80 A of the S of Sec. 15. (Dist. 69 Archives, Ardis Coninx, Ed., p. 1).

1897   (April)    Dr. George Sinztel becomes 4th President of the Village Board. (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 113).

April 5    The Cook County Board of Trustees of Schools designates the aforementioned area surrounding Niles Centre as School District No. 7. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 1).

July 19    Voters pass the following referenda propositions: 1) Directors are authorized to purchase a school site not to exceed 1 A; 2) Bonds not to exceed $5,000.00 may be issued; 3) A tax may be levied. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 1).

July 19    First teachers are appointed by District 7 School Trustees. They are: N.M. Banta, Mary E. Goett and Alma Klehm. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 1).

Summer    Bonifazius Baumann sells 1 A site to the District 7 School Board of Trustees for construction of a school building. It is located on the east side of Niles Center Road at present day Madison Street. The US Post Office presently occupies the site. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 1).

Summer    People from the northern Chicago area attend a three day convention of the Plattdeutsch Guild held in Morton Grove's St. Paul Park which is owned and operated by George C. Klehm. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 67 / Villager, June 19, 1958, p. 17).

September 1    District 7 leases space in the Engine House on Floral Avenue for the purpose of conducting classes. The lease expires 12/06/1897. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 2).

September 12    The Ladies Aid Society of St. Peter's Evangelical Lutheran Church is organized. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 21 / Festschrift zum funfzig-jahrigen Jubilarum, 1868-1918, Evng. Luth. St. Petri Gemeinde, Niles Center, Illinois, 1918, p.24).

Sharp Corner School opens as a two-room school house. An older school had existed on the west side of the street. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 28 / Rosemary Schmitt, ** Skokie Historical Society, March 10, 1987).

1898    School District 68 is established. (Archives, School District 68).

September    145 children are enrolled St. Peter Catholic school. (Buisseret, et.al., op.cit., p. 88).

1899    George H. Klehm stood on Lincoln Avenue for one week and asked every passing team owner to haul one load of gravel to improve the road. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 1 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 5* / Rosche, op.cit., pp. 5?6 / Sunday Life (Skokie),* sec. 1-A, January 17, 1971, p. 8).

Eight students graduated from the Niles Center public school. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 5*).

August 24    The Village of Niles, formerly known as Dutchman's Point, is incorporated. (The Illinois Fact Book and Historical Almanac, 1673-1968. John Clayton, Carbondale, IL: SIU Press, 1970, p. 40 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p.64*/ Tyse, op.cit., p. 15 / Villager, June 19, 1958, p. 16*).

December    Alma Klehm begins her teaching career in Niles Center. Her first school was in the second floor of the Engine House on Floral Avenue. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p.47).

Some settlers who arrived in this decade are:

  • Gustav Borman (Germany)
  • Herman & Mary Loeding (Germany)
  • Barney Connolly
  • Nicholas Platz (Luxembourg)
  • Fred Engstler (Rhineland)
  • Lorenz Schaub (Baden)
  • Mr. & Mrs. Hohs and son Peter (Wisconsin)
  • Dr. George Sintzel
  • William Teegan, (Hamburg)
  • Christ & Katherine Holtmann and their four children
  • Joseph Webber
  • Xavery Wojikiewicz (Poland)

(Beaudette, op.cit., pp. 30, 53, 61, 113 / News (Skokie), July 22, 1976, p. 18 / Niles Center Press, February 6, 1931, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, December 2, 1932, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, December 30, 1932, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, May 3, 1935, p. 1; Tyse, op. cit., p. 14).

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1900 to 1909

ca. 1900    English replaces German in the services at St. Peter's German Evangelical Lutheran Church. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 76).

Edwin T. Klehm builds a home with Niles Centre's first indoor toilet, and a windmill in the rear of the lot to pump water. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 49 / Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 26).

The Niles Centre School building opened on Niles Centre Road. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, pp. 10,47).

Population of Niles Centre is 529. (Clayton, op.cit., p. 41).

1900   (August 4)    John W. Brown is appointed to the Committee on Organization of the County Town Federation of Cook County. The purpose of the group is to preserve the power of township governments as an antidote to Chicago. (The Evanston Index, August 10, 1900).

1901   (July 4)    Lightning strikes the church tower of St. Peter's German Evangelical Lutheran Church. A new church tower had to be built. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 76).

April 27    Clerk's Report of Organization is filed with the Township Treasurer. It identifies School District 7 as School District 69. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 2).

1902   (January)    The Cook County Truck Gardeners and Farmers Association is formed. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 68 / Niles Center Press, January 9, 1931, p. 1).

Alma Klehm transferred to teach in the South Niles Center School (later Fairview) which included fifty-six children in two rooms, grades one through five. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 47).

St. Peter Evangelical Lutheran Church builds its second church on Oakton Street. (Our Family Album, op.cit., p.3).

1903   (February)    The Cook County Truck Gardeners and Farmers Association is incorporated. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 68 / Niles Center Press, January 9, 1931, p. 1).

November 15    The new building for the St. Peter's German Evangelical Lutheran Church is completed. (Beaudette, op.cit. p. 21 / Life (Skokie)*, sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 76* / News (Skokie), November 16, 1933, p. 1).

November 18    The Hay-Bunau-Varilla Treaty grants sovereignty over a 10 mile wide strip of Panamanian territory to the United States for the purposes of constructing a canal. (Morris, op.cit., 294).

The Northwestern Railroad builds a branch through Niles Center, with a station at Oakton, just west of present day Skokie Boulevard. (Chicago and Northwestern Transportation Company, Public Relations**, Northwestern System Chronological Chart, rev. January 18, 1973: June 18, 1978 / Life (Skokie)*, sec. 3, January 17, 1963, pp. 13, 21 / Villager*, July 3, 1958, p. 13)

St. Paul's Ladies Aid Society of St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church is formed. (News (Skokie), December 10, 1943, p. 1 / News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 42).

1905    From this date until 1918, silent movies are shot in the Village by the Essanay Film Manufacturing Company. (Chicago-Herald & Examiner, part 5, August 14, 1938, pp. 1-2 / Illinois; A History of the Prairie State, Robert P. Howard, 1972, p. 458 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 19).

July 2    Section 15 of the Luxembourg Brotherhood of America is formed by 21 charter members. (Luxembourg Brotherhood of America, 1887 - 1987, Richard J. Witry, 1987, p. 120 / News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 112).

1906    A Village ordinance is passed barring people under the age of fifteen from the street after 8 p.m. (Chicago's American, January 17, 1959, p. 9).

1907   (July 24)    The "North Shore & Western RR" begins service on tracks laid between present day Lincolnwood Drive in Evanston and the Glen View Golf Club. The route. 3.75 miles long, followed Harrison Street / Old Orchard Rd. It crossed Gross Point Rd., Skokie Highway (Skokie Blvd), the Chicago & NW tracks, Harms Rd. and the Chicago River. Car No. 1 is labeled the "Dinky". Thus the name "Dinky Line". (William E. Robertson, The North Shore & Western Railway: A History, Summer, 1988, p. 11-12, Archives Skokie Historical Society).

October 17    The Niles Centre State Bank (later the First National Bank of Skokie) is organized by Arista B. Williams, John W. Brown, Peter M. Hoffman, William J. Galitz and others. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 12 / League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 16 / News (Skokie), March 17, 1950, p. 1 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, pp. 5, 66).

1908    Work begins on the North Shore Channel of the Metropolitan Sanitary District of Greater Chicago. Completed in 1910, the eight mile channel runs from Lake Michigan at Wilmette to the North Branch of the Chicago River at Lawrence Avenue. (Life (Skokie)*, sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 13 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 77 / News (Skokie), July 22, 1976, p. 19 / Villager, June 26, 1958, p. 15 / Ward Walker, The Story of the Metropolitan Sanitary District of Greater Chicago, the Seventh Wonder of American Engineering, Metropolitan Sanitary District, Chicago, 1959, p. 18).

1909    137 children are enrolled at St. Peter Catholic School. (Buisseret, et.al., op.cit., p. 90).

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1910 to 1919

1910    The English spelling of Niles Centre is abandoned. The Americanized version, Niles Center, is adopted. (Whittingham, op.cit. p. 5).

The Junior Maidens society is formed. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 31 / League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 17).

April    George H. Klehm becomes President of the Village Board and has the all-night dram shops closed. (Sunday Life (Skokie),* sec. 1-A, January 17, 1971, p. 7 / (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 113).

August 29    A telephone company exchange is installed in Niles Centre at the home of Martha Kindt by the Chicago Telephone Company, which provided crank type service with free calls to Morton Grove and Niles. / Life (Skokie)*, sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 78 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 99 / "Skokie and the Telephone", Illinois Bell Telephone, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

September - October    A fire starts in the barn in the back of Jacob Melzer's saloon. It burns for thirty-six hours and destroys much of downtown Niles Center. The water used to douse the fire comes from the lagoon on Peter Blameuser's property located at the NE corner of Niles and Oakton Street. This event initiated the demand for a waterworks system. (Beaudette, op.cit. pp. 2, 14 / Evanston Press, September 10, 1910, p. 1 / League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 13) / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 58/ News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 100 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 5 / Niles Center Press, September 8, 1933, p. 1 / Rosche, op.cit., pp. 8-9 / Villager*, June 26, 1958, p. 15 / Whittingham, op.cit., pp. 63 - 65).

1911    Tessville, present day Lincolnwood, is incorporated as a village. (Beaudette, op.cit. p. 155 / News (Skokie), July 22, 1976, p. 19).

Farmer Fred Guelzow, member of the Cook County Truck Gardeners and Farmers Association, is murdered and his body found on Lincoln Avenue. (Beaudette, op.cit. p. 70 ).

The Niles Center Hotel, started by Henry Harms in 1865, is destroyed by fire. (Life (Skokie)*, sec. 3, January 17, 1963, pp. 13, 78 / Rosemary Schmitt**, Skokie Historical Society: March 10, 1987).

The Northern Illinois Gas Company constructs a gas manufacturing and storage facility at McCormick and Oakton. (Life (Skokie)*, sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 36 / News (Skokie), November 15, 1962, p. 16).

St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church is built on Niles Center Road. (News (Skokie), February, 3, 1955, p. 42).

1912    The Westmoreland Golf Club is established and contributes $1,100 for the grading of Harrison Street. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 8 / Robertson, op.cit., p. 12).

1913   (July)    Voters in all Niles Township School Districts vote to add a 9th grade to the curriculum. As District 69 has a vacant room, the Niles Center Public School is chosen to house the 9th grade for the Township schools. Each School District (67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72 & 73) pays $120.00 per year to support the cost. Miss Josephine Brown is the first 9th grade teacher at a salary of $90.00 per month. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 3).

December 1    The first mile of permanent paved road (concrete) in Cook County was dedicated on Church Street in Niles Center. (Life (Skokie)*, sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 73 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 3 / Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 26).

George Landeck, Commissioner of the Westmoreland Drainage District, calls a public meeting to pass a $30,000 bond issue to correct bad roads. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 8).

Memorial Park Cemetery is established. (Robertson, op.cit., p. 12).

The roundup of horse thieves in Cook County begins. Up to this time, Cook County reputedly had more horses stolen than in all of Texas, Wyoming and the Dakotas combined. (Beaudette, op.cit., p.74) / Sunday Life (Skokie),* sec. 1-A, January 17, 1971, p. 7).

A violent storm tears down the corner of turret towers of the main bell tower of St. Peter's German Evangelical Lutheran Church. (Life (Skokie)*, sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 76 / News (Skokie), February, 3, 1955, p. 40).

Illinois General Assembly grants women the right to vote for presidential electors. (Whitney, op.cit., p. 12).

1914   (August 15)    The Panama Canal is opened to ship traffic. (Morris, op.cit., p. 298).

The Farmer's Market closes. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, pp. 3, 17*).

Burg Bridge was built on Oakton Street over the canal. (Beaudette, op.cit., p.8 / Rosche, op.cit., p. 8).

A scarlet fever epidemic closes the schools for two weeks. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 8).

1915    Construction of a plant to produce dynamite and TNT, the "world's largest powder factory," begins near Lincoln and Oakton. Outraged citizens forced it to move. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 22 / News (Skokie), February, 3, 1955, p. 21 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 11).

ca. 1915    Niles Center Theater is built. (Beaudette, op.cit., pp. 8, 28 / League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 15 / Skokie Historical Society Collection of unpublished letters, 1979?: June 3, 1980 / Whittingham, op.cit., p. 60).

Ivan Paroubek (photograph of Paroubek Harness Shop) establishes a bakery at 8101 Niles Center Road. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 58).

Census of school children in Niles Township, by district, is

  • District 1: 150
  • District 2: 137
  • District 3: 199
  • District 4: 150
  • District 5: 65

(Beaudette, op. cit., p. 87).

1916    The Village Board grants a franchise to the Chicago, Fox Lake and Northern Interurban Railroad to build east-west on Oakton Street. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 5 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 5 / Villager, July 3, 1958, p. 13).

The Niles Center State Bank moves into its new red brick building at 8001 Lincoln Avenue. (Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

Some community organizations existing in Niles Center:

  • Liederkranz Kornblume (German Singing Society)
  • Niles Center Woman's Organization
  • Harmony Card Club
  • Junior Maidens

(Beaudette, op.cit., p. 31).

Some businesses located in Niles Center:

  • Entertainment:

Albert Alf Buffet

Herman Egebrecht Buffet

Niles Center Theater

  •  Flower growers:

Herbert Baumann

E. H. Blameuser (Invoice)

John C. Meier

Ludwig Schmitt

Stielow Brothers

  • Agricultural goods and services:

Henry W. Bruns (seeds)

M. M. Gabel (Invoice)

Gerhardt Brothers (Invoice)

Honemann and Baumhardt (blacksmith)

Edwin T. Klehm (seeds/general merchandise)

George Lohrmann (carpenter/contractor)

Stephen Losch and Son (tomato and lettuce boxes)

Niles Center Mercantile Co. (seeds/general merchandise)

George W. Mittelstaedt (farm/greenhouse boxes)

Joe Nellessen's Express (delivery)

Niles Center Coal and Building Material Company

August Ruhnke (carpenter/contractor)

Wenzel and Kante (mason/contractors)

  • General goods and services:

James E. Brunger (painter/decorator)

E. E. Cleland and Son (ice cream and sweet shop)

John P. Even (shoe repair/men's clothing)

Jacob Franz (tailor)

Rudolph W. Fruehe (poultry/eggs)

Frank J. Gabriel (carpenter/jobber)

Henry Heinz (auto dealership)

George H. Klehm (insurance)

Niles Center Electric Shoe Repair Shop

Niles Center State Bank

Niles Realty Company (insurance/real estate)

Paroubek's Bakery

John W. Rohde (painting/decorating)

Lorenz Schaub (liquor) 

Charles August Schmitt (photographer)

August Siegel (cigar manufacturer)

Robert E. Siegel (barber)

Tess Brothers (grocery/market)

William Wickmann Dairy

(Beaudette, op.cit., p. 158).

1917   (April 6)     The United States House of Representatives concurs in a Resolution declaring war on Germany, previously passed by the Senate on April 4. USA enters World War I. (Morris, op.cit., p. 309).

1917   Evanston Golf Club purchases land at 4401 Dempster Street. (Evanston Golf Club History)

1918    A typewriter was first used to record the minutes of the Village board meeting. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 17).

1918    (November 11) World War I ends. (Niles Center celebration)

January     This was the proposed date for the commencement of the Northwestern Interurban Street Car Railway, which never came to fruition. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 5; Villager, July 3, 1958, p. 13).

1919   (January 29)     The 18th Amendment to the United States Constitution, prohibiting the manufacture and sale of alcoholic beverages is declared ratified. It will go into effect on January 16, 1920. (Morris, op.cit., p. 278).

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1920 to 1929

1920   (January 16)     The 18th Amendment to the United States Constitution, prohibiting the manufacture and sale of alcoholic beverages, becomes effective. Niles Center counts sixty-one prohibition speakeasies. (League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 12 / Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 26).

St. Peter Catholic Church, under the pastorate of Rev. Anthony Wolfgarten, begins the transition from German to English language services. (Buisseret et.al., op.cit., p. 5, 7 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 96).

The Samuel Insull interests moved into the Niles Center area to begin a real estate boom. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 21 / News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 3 / Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 24 / Villager, July 3, 1958, p. 13).

Bill Strum became Niles Center's first motorcycle policeman at a monthly salary of one hundred dollars. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 7).

Population of Niles Center is 763. (Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 27).

Teachers in District 69 threaten to quit unless their salaries are raised. Salaries increased to at least $100.00 per month. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 4).

1923    Bradley & Haben Funeral Home is established in Niles Center at 8038 Lincoln Avenue. Telephone number is 27 J. (Witry, op.cit., p. 135).

April    John E. Brown, the son of Niles Center's second Village President, is elected Niles Center's 6th Village President. (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 112).

Dr. Melvin Little constructs a home on Lucille Court n/k/a Concord Lane at Kenton Street. It is constructed of logs and granite and it cost $45,000.00. (Central United Methodist Church, Its first Sixty-five Years, 1930-95. Ardis Coninx, p. 2).

1924   (March 16)     The Niles Center Press begins publication. (Niles Center Press, March 16, 1934, p. 1 / Rosche, op.cit., p. 10).

April 4     The Chicago North Shore and Northern Railroad begins construction to extend the Skokie Valley Route to Dempster Street in Niles Center. This part of the elaborate interurban system contains some difficult construction problems. (North Shore; America's fastest interurban. William D. Middleton, Golden West Books, San Marino, CA., 1964, pp. 48-54).

October 18     Harold "Red" Grange scores 5 touchdowns to lead the University of Illinois to a 39-14 victory over Michigan. (Chicago Tribune, Bill Jauss, August 10, 1997, Sports page 3A 3.)

December     District 69 School Board of Trustees convenes a special meeting of the Board for the purpose of responding to a citizen petition requesting a referendum to determine whether a new school site (the location of the present Lincoln school) should be purchased. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 4).

1925   (January 20) A special election is held. District 69 voters approve the purchase of land at present day Babb Avenue and Lincoln Avenue. The 8.8 A site is purchased for $9,742.70. Downtown Niles Center Aerial (Coninx, op.cit., p. 4).

March 21    The Village adopts the motto "Niles Center -- We Do". (Greater News (Skokie), January 29, 1926, p. 8).

April 17    The Skokie Chamber of Commerce is formed under the name "Niles Center Businessman's Club". George Busscher, Jr. is first president. (Greater News (Skokie), January 29, 1926, p. 8 / News (Skokie), February, 3, 1955, p. 22 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 51 / News (Skokie), May 13, 1965, p. 16).

November     Evanstonian, Charles Gates Dawes, is elected Vice-President of the United States. He also receives the Nobel Peace Price for conceiving the "Dawes Plan" for the reconstruction of Germany after World War I. (Whitney, op.cit., p. 13).

Bootlegging is at its highest peak in Niles Township communities. (Greater News (Skokie): see 1926 issues / Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 26 / Skokie, Illinois Community Development Department, Planning Section, 1964, p. 4).

The News begins publication. (News (Skokie), January 7, 1932, p. 1 News (Skokie), open house sec., November 2, 1951, p. 2 / Rosche, op.cit., p. 10 / Sunday Life (Skokie), sec. 1-A, January 17, 1971, p. 8).

Installation of a sewer system costing $39,000 begins in Niles Center. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 5 / Villager, June 26, 1958, p. 15).

The Village issues its first building permit for a gas station at the corner of Niles Center Road and Church Street. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p.64 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p.36 / Skokie, Illinois Department of Community Development, Planning Section, 1964, p. 2-3 / Sunday Life (Skokie), sec. 1-A, January 17, 1971, p. 8).

Reflecting the growth of Niles Center as a suburban community, Mayor John E. Brown and the Village board complete many water, sewer and paving improvements. Agitation for these improvements had begun after the 1910 fire. (Beaudette, op.cit., p. 2 / Greater News (Skokie), January 29, 1926, p. 1 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 43 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 5 / Villager, June 26, 1958, p. 15).

1926 (February)     The first trains run on Niles Center elevated lines extending Chicago Rapid Transit Company operations from Howard Street to Dempster Street. (Chicago Transit Authority. Research and Planning Department, 1968, p. 5 / Greater News (Skokie), January 8, 1926, p. 8 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 14 / Middleton, op.cit., p. 51 / Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 27 / Skokie, Illinois Department of Community Development, Planning Section, 1964, pp. 3-4 / Sunday Life (Skokie), sec. 1?-, January 17, 1971, p. 8).

1926  (September)     Mildred Tess becomes employed as a teacher in District 69. She begins a long tenure with District 69 and High School District 219. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 5).

November 22     Classes start in the new Bronx public school, on Dempster Street, for kindergarten through the third grade. (Greater News (Skokie), November 19, 1926, p. 1). Margaret McGuire is hired as teacher. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 5).

The Chicago North Shore and Milwaukee Railway use the Chicago Rapid Transit Authority lines to Milwaukee. (Chicago Transit Authority. Research and Planning Department, 1968, p. 7 / Greater News (Skokie), see 1926 issues / Middleton, op.cit., p. 52 / Skokie, Illinois Department of Community Development, Planning Section, 1964, p. 4).

Niles Center's first Dollar Days are held. (Sunday Life (Skokie), sec. 1-A, January 17, 1971, p. 8).

July     $500,000 in water, lighting and sewer contracts are let by the Village. (Greater News (Skokie), July 23, 1926, p. 1).

September 10     A tentative zoning plan for the entire village of Niles Center is presented to the public by the Niles Center Zoning Commission. (Greater News (Skokie), September 26, 1926, p. 1).

October     Building permits issued in this month by the Village Clerk push the dollar value of construction for 1926 over the total for the previous record year, 1925, as intensified residential development continues in the Village. (Greater News (Skokie), November 5, 1926, p. 1 / Skokie, Illinois Department of Community Development, Planning Section, 1964, p. 3).

November     The Woman's Club of Niles Center (now the Woman's Club of Skokie) is founded (incorporated: 1929). Eleanor Walter,** Woman's Club of Skokie, 1967: June 21, 1978 / News (Skokie), January 6, 1950, p. 7 News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 38 / News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 14 / Skokie Life, October 27, 1949, p. 1 / Skokie Life, October 30, 1941, p. 6).

November 21     College Hill School is dedicated. (Greater News (Skokie), November 12, 1926, p. 1).

November 22     Classes started in the new Bronx public school for kindergarten through the third grade. (Greater News (Skokie), November 19, 1926, p. 1).

Armond King, sent by Krenn & Dato to manage Devonshire Manor, establishes a real estate business in Niles Center. (Witry, op.cit., 141 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 2 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p.12 / Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 24).

Niles Center has four public schools:

         Niles Center: 166 pupils

         Fairview: 39 pupils

         East Prairie: 104 pupils

         Sharp Corner: 74 pupils

Total public school student population is 383. (Greater News (Skokie), January 8, 1926, p. 6).

1927   (February)     District 69 Board of Trustees receives a petition requesting the construction of a building at the Babb Avenue school site purchased after the 1925 election. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 5).

The Municipal Building (Village Hall) is built at 5127 Oakton. (League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 17 / Rosche, op.cit., p. 3).

The Bronx Building, considered one of the most magnificent suburban structures at the time, is built at Bronx and Dempster, at a cost of $170,000 to give the image of prosperity to future residents. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 8 / Sunday Life (Skokie),* sec. 1-A, January 17, 1971, p. 8 / Villager, Feature Sec., April 14, 1958, pp. 20, 21).

September     Dr. Melville Little sells his log cabin home to the North Shore Military Academy which opens in Niles Center. It is this log building which will become the original building for the Central United Methodist Church. (Greater News (Skokie), December 30, 1926, p. 1 / Greater News (Skokie), August 24, 1928, p. 1 / Ardis Coninx, Central United Methodist Church, Its first Sixty-five Years, 1930-95, p. 2).

September 22     Gene Tunney defeats Jack Dempsey at Soldier Field for the heavyweight boxing title in the "the long count" match. (Chicago Tribune, Bill Jauss, August 10, 1997, Sports page 3A 3.)

1928    Niles Center has a building volume of more than $2,000,000 with the construction of 162 new homes. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 3 / Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 27 / Skokie, Illinois Department of Community Development, Planning Section, 1964, p. 3).

February 3     The Park District of Niles Center is founded. The first elected commissioners are:

         Emil E. Blameuser

         John Kalmes

         Leo Heinz

         A.C. Galitz

         W.R. Nelson

(League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 23 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, pp. 3, 71 / Sunday Life (Skokie),* sec. 1-A, January 17, 1971, p. 8 / History of the Skokie Park District, p. 9, Archives, Skokie Park District).

September.    Niles Center school enrollments are:

         St. Peter Catholic School - 24322

         Sharp Corner - 84

         East Prairie - 93

         College Hill - 50

         Niles Center - 202

         Fairview - 40

Total pupils - 712 (Greater News (Skokie),September 7, 1928, p. 1).

September 4     The new Lincoln Avenue building of the Niles Center School opens with 202 students. It is known as the Niles Center School. (Greater News (Skokie), August 24, 1928, p. 1 / News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 103 / District 69 Archives, This is Your Life, Lincoln School, Coninx, op.cit.).

October 3     The North Side Sewage Treatment plant, largest of its kind in the world, is formally opened at McCormick and Howard in Niles Center. (Greater News (Skokie), September 28, 1928, p. 1 / Greater News (Skokie), October 5, 1928, p. 1).

October 14     Auxiliary Bishop Bernard J. Sheil, plus twenty other officials of the Catholic Church, dedicate the new 10 room building at St. Peter Catholic School on Niles Center Road. (Greater News (Skokie), October 12, 1928, p. 1 / Buisseret, et.al., op.cit., pp. 7, 92).

November 7     Niles Center firemen are granted a pay allowance of $1.50 for the first hour and $1.00 for each hour thereafter. (Greater News (Skokie), November 9, 1928, p. 1).

December 8     The National Bank of Niles Center, the first nationally chartered bank in Niles Township, opens for business just west of the NW corner of Lincoln and Oakton. Ferdinand Baumann is President. (Whittingham, op.cit., 75 / Greater News (Skokie), December 7, 1928, p. 1).

1929   (April)    The Cosmos Club of Niles Center (photograph from Club Yearbook) is organized. It will meet on the 3rd Monday of each month at the Niles Center Municipal Building. The first President is Amelia Brooks Chase. (Cosmos Club Archives).23 / News, (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 64 / Niles Center Press, February 13, 1931, p. 1 / Selma Regan Petty, History of the Skokie Public Library).

April     The Niles Township Boy Scout movement begins. (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 86).

May     The new building at the Sharp Corner School is opened. (News (Skokie), open house section, November 2, 1951, p. 14).

July 26     The Cosmos Club announced that its mission will be the creation of a free public library for Niles Center to be called the "Niles Center Free Public Library". Mrs. S.A. Stenson will chair the committee. (Chicago Evening American, July 26, 1929).

July     Bids to construct a four room addition to Lincoln School are awarded. (Coninx, op.cit.p. 6).

September 7     The telephone company switching building at 8231 Niles Center Rd. is completed. Mayor John E. Brown places the first telephone call through the battery switchboard in the new building. There are 1,252 telephone customers in Niles Center. (News (Skokie), open house section, November 2, 1951, p. 14 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 99 / "Skokie and the Telephone", Illinois Bell Telephone, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

September 25     The Cosmos Club takes possession of rooms on the second floor of the "National Bank Building". Dr. A. Louise Klehm donates the first books. Mayor John E. Brown leads efforts to raise money to fund the rent. (Niles Center News, September 27, 1929).

October 29     "Black Tuesday" on Wall Street. The Great Depression begins. Construction in the Village is halted. Niles Center is left with many vacant lots, equipped with paved streets, sidewalks, lighting, sewers and water. (Illinois Guide and Gazetteer, Rand McNally, Chicago, 1969, p. 475 / Skokie, Illinois Department of Community Development, Planning Section, 1964, p. 5 / Sunday Life (Skokie),* sec. 1-A, January 17, 1971, pp. 7-8).

Raymond Haben builds his funeral home at 8057 Niles Center Road on property previously purchased in 1928. (Witry, op.cit., p. 136).

Niles Center Lions Club is formed. (Greater News (Skokie), June 26, 1931, p.1).

Niles Center Park District purchases approximately 62 acres of land from the Cook County Forest Preserve District for $62,000.00. The land is bounded by Oakton Street on the north, Brummel Street on the south, Kenton Avenue on the east and Lincoln Avenue on the west. Part of this property is later ceded to High School District 219 for the construction of Niles Township High School. In addition, the Park District purchases the 5.3 acre Terminal Park site. (History of the Skokie Park District, p. 9, Archives, Skokie Park District / Greater News (Skokie), February 14, 1930, p. 1 / News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 24).

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1930 to 1939

1930   (January)     C.W. Hill, Principal of Lincoln School, advocates the unification of the separate school districts in Niles Center. (Coninx, op.cit. "This is your Life, Lincoln School").

February 8     The Niles Center Free Public Library, located on the second floor of the National Bank Building, opens its doors to the public. (Niles Center News, August 20, 1930). The Cosmos Club holds an informal opening of the Niles Center Free Public Library (Greater News (Skokie), February 7, 1930, p. 1 / Greater News (Skokie), February 14, 1930, p. 1 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, pp. 3, 17 / Niles Center Press, February 13, 1931, p. 1 / Petty, 1960, unp. / Rosche, op.cit., p.10 / Sunday Life (Skokie),* sec. 1-A, January 17, 1971, p. 8).

February 18     The Niles Center Public School (n/k/a Lincoln Junior High) is dedicated. Francis G. Blair, State Supt. of Public Ed. and E.J. Tobin, Cook County Supt. of Schools, are present. (Coninx, op. cit., "Information on Lincoln School").

February 28     The formal dedication of District 69's Lincoln public school building in Niles Center is held. (Greater News (Skokie), February 14, 1930, p. 1).

April 1     The United States Postal Service starts house to house delivery of the mail. (Greater News (Skokie), January 31, 1930, p. 1).

June 13     One hundred seventeen persons, desirous of working, are unemployed in Niles Center. (Greater News (Skokie), June 13, 1930, p. 1 Sunday Life (Skokie),* sec. 1-A, January 17, 1971, p. 8).

June     It is announced that Mrs. Leo J. Regan is elected the 2nd President of the Cosmos Club of Niles Center. (Cosmos Club Archives).

August     District 69 agrees to accept students from District 73 at the rate of $100.00 per pupil per school year. (Coninx, op.cit. p. 6).

September     Talking movies make their debut at the Niles Center Theater. (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 79 / Greater News (Skokie), September 5, 1930, p. 1 / (News (Skokie), open house section, November 2, 1951, p. 14).

October     The Central Church of Niles Center (Methodist Episcopal) is organized, and in January 1931, was housed in the log structure originally built for the North Shore Military Academy. (Greater News (Skokie), October 3, 1930, p. 1 / Greater News (Skokie), November 28, 1930, p. 1 / Greater News (Skokie), January 16, 1931, p. 1 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, pp. 25, 42 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 49).

November 9     Central Church conducts its first Sunday school in a room in the Bronx Building. (Coninx, Central United Methodist Church, op.cit., 2).

November     All unemployed residents of Niles Center are requested to register with the Village in an effort to provide jobs. Men worked alternate shifts in order to spread the work around. (Greater News (Skokie), Issues of November 14, November 21, December 5, December 31, 1930, p. 1 / News (Skokie), January 14, 1932, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, January 23, 1931).

November     The Christian Science Society of Niles Center is organized. (News (Skokie), February 5, 1955, p. 24 / News (Skokie), May 17, 1973, p. 18).

Fall     Girl Scouting begins in Niles Center. The first troop is from Sharp Corner School. (News (Skokie)*, February 3, 1955, p. 87 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 59).

The Presbyterian Community Church of Niles Center is organized. (Greater News (Skokie), October 3, 1930, p. 1).

Wyeth Laboratories moves to 8100 McCormick in Niles Center (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 80).

College Hill School was begun as part of the Evanston School District which is now District 65. (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p.111).

Population of Niles Center is 5,007. (United States Bureau of Census, Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930, U.S. GPO, Washington, D.C., p.24 / Chicago Tribune*, July 7, 1963, Section 10, p.1).

1931   (January)     The first short wave radio equipped squad car is purchased for the Niles Center Police Department. (Niles Center Press, January 16, 1931, p. 1).

January 4     Thirty worshipers gather for the first service at the new log cabin home of Central Methodist Church. Rev. Stiles presides. (Ardis Coninx, Central United Methodist Church, Its first Sixty-five Years, 1930-95, p. 2).

February     R.E. Cotanche is employed as Superintendent of Education of District 69. (Coninx, op.cit. p. 6).

February 7     The first anniversary of the opening of the Niles Center Free Public Library is held at the Library. All of Niles Center's 5,014 citizens are invited to attend. 2,070 books are available for check out. (Niles Center News, January 30, 1931). Library hours are Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm and Saturday, 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm (Chicago Herald & Examiner, February 7, 1931).

February 17     The Niles Center Board of Health is created. (Greater News (Skokie), February 18, 1931, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, February 20, 1931, p. 1).

ca. April     The Niles Center Public School at Babb and Lincoln Avenue is now called Lincoln School. (Coninx, op.cit. p. 6).

June 21     After several months of consideration, Trinity Episcopal Church of Niles Center begins services. (Greater News (Skokie), June 19, 1931, p. 1 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 44 / Niles Center Press, February 20, 1931, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, May, 25, 1934, p. 1).

July 10     Rev. Frederick Detzer, pastor of St. Paul's Lutheran church for fifty years, dies. He is succeeded by Rev. Otto Arndt, and English is first used extensively at church services. (News (Skokie), May 27, 1932, p. 1 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 63 / Niles Center Press, July 17, 1931, p. 1).

August 8     The second annual Kirmess of the  Luxembourg Brotherhood, Section 8 parade through Niles Center. The first was in 1930. (Niles Center Press, August 7, 1931, p. 1).

September 7 & 8     High school classes are held for the first time in the Township. (Greater News (Skokie), May 1, 1931, p. 1 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 43). 49 students attend a two-year high school program at Lincoln School. (A revealing account of Nilehi history. Sandra Morrison / Winter or Spring, 1976, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

Fall     The words "Lincoln School" are carved above the entryway at the school located at Babb and Lincoln Avenue. (Coninx, op.cit. p. 7).

October 30     Mayors John E. Brown of Niles Center and Herbert Dilg of Morton Grove issue a joint proclamation stating that Township families of men who are jobless through no fault of their own must be provided with winter relief. (News (Skokie), open house sec., November 2, 1951, p. 14).

November 24     Cleveland School is dedicated. (Greater News (Skokie), November 19, 1931, p. 1 / News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 104 Niles Center Press, November 20, 1931, p. 1).

November 29     Methodist Bishop Edwin Hold Hughes dedicates Central Methodist Church. (Ardis Coninx, Central United Methodist Church, op.cit., 2).

Community organizations formed:

         Community Choral Society of Niles Center (News (Skokie), March 24, 1932, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, November 6, 1931, p. 1).

         Niles Center Post 320 of the American Legion (News (Skokie), December 17, 1931, p. 1 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 100 Niles Center Press, December 23, 1931, p. 1).

The Niles Center Park District purchases 10 acres of nursery land which later becomes Central Park. (News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 24 / History of the Skokie Park District, p. 9, Archives, Skokie Park District).

1932   (March 31)    School District 69 formally opens the Lincoln School, Lincoln and Harms Avenues, and the new high school is dedicated (News, (Skokie), March 31, 1932, p. 1).

April     Mrs. Gilbert Lappley is elected as the third President of the Cosmos Club of Niles Center. (Cosmos Club Archives).

May     Rev. Walter C. Scott arrives at Central Methodist Church. (Ardis Coninx, Central United Methodist Church, op.cit., 3).

May 15     George H. Klehm, prominent Niles Center civic leader, dies of heart failure. (News (Skokie), May 20, 1932, p. 1).

June 5.    The Niles Center Movie Theater opens as a "talkie house." (News (Skokie), June 3, 1932, p. 1).

September     District 69 Board of Education adds a third year of instruction to the high school curriculum. Registration increases to 115 students. (Morrison, op.cit. p.1).

October 11    A special election is held to determine whether a tax should be imposed to fund library services. It is defeated by 29 votes. (Skokie Life, October 30, 1941, p. 1).

October 22    The Cosmos Club closes the Niles Center Free Public Library. (Skokie Life, October 30, 1941, p. 1).

The Niles Center Police Department is formally organized. (League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 23 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 7).

Lincoln Avenue becomes a state highway. (Villager, July 10, 1958, p. 13).

1933   (January)     The cornerstone is laid at 8201 Karlov Avenue for Trinity Episcopal Church. (News (Skokie), January 19, 1933, p. 1).

March     The Niles Center State Bank and National Bank of Niles Center re-open after the bank holiday. (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 77 / News (Skokie), March 16, 1933, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, December 29, 1933, p. 1).

April 7     The National Bank of Niles Center is robbed by armed bandits and cashier, Harry Mueller, is killed.24 (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 30 / News (Skokie), April 13, 1933, p. 1 / News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 7 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 7 / Niles Center Press, April 28, 1933, p. 1).

April    George E. Blameuser is elected the 7th Village President. His father, Peter Blameuser III, was the Village's 3rd President (1895-97). (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 112).

June     Draining the Skokie Marsh and improving the banks of the North Branch were included in President Roosevelt's reforestation projects. (Niles Center Press, June 23, 1933, p. 1).

August     Twenty-one Niles Center employers pledged to support the NRA code. (News (Skokie), August 3, 1933, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, August 4, 1933, p. 1).

September 21     Mrs. Ethyl M. Griffin is appointed to succeed Mrs. Lappley as President of the Cosmos Club. (Cosmos Club Archives).

Only seven homes, with a total value of $36,100 are constructed. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 3) / Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 27).

Because of the Depression, the Chamber of Commerce reduces dues from $25.00 to $5.00 per year. (Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 27).

Legal 3.2% beer starts flowing legally in Niles Center for the first time in the thirteen years since prohibition. (News (Skokie), April 6, 1933, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, December 29, 1933, p. 1).

Village Officials renovate portions of the Municipal Building to house the Niles Center Public Library. (Skokie Life, October 30, 1941, p. 1).

1934   (January)    The National Bank of Niles Center fails; a receiver is appointed and liquidation begins. (Niles Center Press, December 28, 1934, p. 1).

May     The Niles Center Civic Orchestra is formed. (Niles Center Press, May 11, 1934, p. 1).

June     The new College Hill school is dedicated. (Niles Center Press, December 28, 1934, p. 6).

September 27     The Niles Center News reports that nineteen auto deaths were reported in Niles Center "giving the village one of the worst per capita totals in the United States. (Niles Center News, September 27, 1934).

October 4     Police Captain A.C. Stolberg reported on the results of a speed trap which caught 180 speeders. (Cosmos Club Archives).

November 28     Local funeral home director Ray Haben is notified by an anonymous tipster that the dead body of Lester Gillis a/k/a George "Baby Face" Nelson was dumped near St. Paul Lutheran Cemetery after he was shot in a robbery attempt of the Barrington Bank. Federal agents remove the body to Haben's for temporary storage. (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 29, 1934, p.44 / Chicago Herald & Examiner, Nov. 29, 1934, pp. 1,6 / Niles Center Press, December 7, 1934, p. 1).

Niles Center Police Chief Ted Groark is dismissed and Captain Robert Bowman suspended because of indictments obtained by the State's Attorneys Office. The case had been pending since the fall of 1933. (News (Skokie), August 17, 1933, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, September 22, 1933, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, January 19, 1934, p. 1).

1935    A clerical error results in one of the two Northwestern Railroad tracks running through Niles Center being ripped out and service to Chicago is permanently disrupted. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 13).

Tessville changes its name to Lincolnwood. (Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 27).

February 14     The new addition to Lincoln School, consisting of gymnasium, cafeteria, kitchen, locker room, one classroom and remodeled boiler room, is dedicated. (Coninx, op.cit.).

September     Enrollment in District 69 is 450 elementary students children and 260 high school students. (Coninx, op.cit. "Information on Lincoln School").

September 17     The Village Board adopted an ordinance creating a Plan Commission which provided for the orderly development of the Village. (News (Skokie), September 20, 1935, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, September 6, 1935, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, September 20, 1935, p. 1).

October     Niles Center American Legion Post 320 is granted permission to form a woman's auxiliary. (The News, September 19, 1947, p. 11).

October 2     The Federal government grants $22,000.00 to Niles Center for construction of a water reservoir. (News (Skokie), open house sec., November 2, 1951, p.20).

Among community organizations formed are:

  The Auxiliary to Post 320 of the American Legion. (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 87 / Niles Center Press, September 27, 1935, p. 1).

  The SUB-DEB Club. (Niles Center Press, May 17, 1935, p. 1 / 1936).

1936   (January)     Mayor Blameuser appoints the Village Health Department's first full-time employee, a registered nurse, Miss Helen Lies. (News (Skokie), January 10, 1936, p. 1 / News (Skokie), open house sec., November 2, 1951, p. 19).

February 28     School District 75 (now 65) of Evanston votes to take in Village District 68 1/2, College Hill. (News (Skokie), March 6, 1936, p. 1 News (Skokie),* February 3, 1955, p. 111).

March 1     Niles Township adopts Eastern Standard Time foregoing the adoption of "Daylight Saving Time" in April. (News (Skokie), February 28, 1936, p. 1).

June     Voters of Niles Township approve formation of a four-year high school program. Niles Township High School District 219 is created. The newly elected Board of Education appoints R.E. Cotanche high school principal. (Morrison, op.cit. / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 43 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 10).

August 4    The Niles Center Zoning Board hears a proposal to rezone 525 lots from apartments to single family sites. (News (Skokie), July 24, 1936, p. 1).

November 3     The Citizens of Niles Center, by a vote of 1,528 in favor and 445 opposed, adopt the "City Election Law" as their preferred way of conducting elections. (Order entered on November 12, 1936 by the Hon. Edmund K. Jarecki, County Court of County of Cook, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).25

November     Voters of Niles Township approve a $450,000.00 bond issue to construct a high school building on land adjacent to Lincoln School. (Morrison, op.cit.).

1937   (April 29)     Boy Scout Troop #1, sponsored by the Holy Name Society of St. Peter Catholic Church, is formally installed in the Northwest Suburban Council of Boy Scouts. (Niles Center Press, May 7, 1937, p. 1).

September 1    Niles Center Free Public Library hires Bertha Morse Rosche as its first professional librarian. She received a B.A. from Lawrence College of Wisconsin (cum laude), Bachelor of Religious Service from Garret Biblical Institute (Evanston) and an M.A. from Northwestern University. (Archives, Skokie Public Library).

Niles Township High School District 219 purchases 21 acres from the Niles Center Park District for the purpose of constructing Niles Township High School. The sales price is $60,000.00. The proceeds are used to purchase Lorel and Lee Wright parks. (News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 24 / History of the Skokie Park District, p. 9, Archives, Skokie Park District).

Niles Center rezones 5,000 of its 66,000 lots from apartment to residential property. (News (Skokie), January 7, 1938, p. 1).

St. Peter's Evangelical Lutheran Church joins the Evangelical and Reformed Church. (Our Heritage Rings for Progress, op.cit.)

Other community organizations which are formed are the:

         Niles Center Tavern Association (Niles Center Press, January 15, 1937, p. 1)

         Niles Township Unit of the American Red Cross (Niles Center Press, October 15, 1937, p. 1)

         East Prairie School PTA (Niles Center Press, January 1, 1937, p. 1)

Some new businesses which opened in Niles Center are the Cazel-Koch Company, 3401 Dempster (Niles Center. Press, January 15, 1937, p. 1) and Skokie Valley Savings and Loan (Niles Center Press, February 5, 1937, p. 1).

1938    Two-way radio equipment is installed in Niles Center police cars. (News (Skokie), February 11, 1938, p. 1 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 4 Niles Center Press, October 8, 1937, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, February 11, 1938, p. 1).

June 7     Trailer camps are forbidden in the Village under an ordinance adopted by the Village board. (News (Skokie), June 10, 1938, p. 1).

July    The greatest flood ever known to have occurred on the North Branch of the Chicago River is produced by one of the most intense rain storms on record in the Chicago area. (Flood plain information: North Branch Chicago River, West Fork and Skokie River: Cook and Lake Counties, Illinois, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District, 1970, pp. 2, 30, 31, 32).

August 9, 10     Niles Center celebrates its "Golden Jubilee" in connection with Niles Center Days. (Niles Center Press, July 29, 1938, p. 1 / Golden Jubilee Coin, Archives, Skokie Historical Society, 1986.76.7).

December     Niles Center Park District receives a $138,373 grant from the WPA. (Niles Center Press, December 30, 1938, p. 1).

December     Oliver O. Young is appointed Superintendent of Education of District 69 succeeding R.E. Contanche. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 9).

1939   (January)     457 high school students move from Lincoln School to the newly constructed Niles Township High School. R. E. Cotanche is the first principal of the high school. (Coninx, op.cit. "Information on Lincoln School").

January 30     A severe blizzard sweeps in from Lake Michigan and covers the Village with fourteen inches of snow. (News (Skokie), February 2, 1939, p. 1 / Niles Center Press, February 3, 1939, p. 1).

April 16     World War II begins when the Germans attack Poland. General George C. Marshall is sworn in as Army Chief of Staff. (Marshall, Hero for Our Times, Leonard Mosley, Hearst Books, New York, 1982, p. 129).

November     Martin "Scotty" Krier, a director of the Niles Center Chamber of Commerce, forms a committee to effect a name change for the Village. (Witry, op.cit., p. 143).

December 4     The Krier Committee (16 men - 1 woman) narrows the choices of names from 1,097 to 25. Among the surviving choices are Ridgeview, Oakton and Skokie. (Witry, op.cit., p. 143).

December 11     The Illinois Secretary of State, in a letter to Martin "Scotty" Krier, states that the names of "Oakton" and "Ridgeview" are reserved for a period of 60 days. (Copy of Letter dtd December 11, 1939, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

Among community organizations formed are the Niles Center Post of the Veterans of Foreign Wars (News (Skokie), January 26, 1939, p. 1) and the Niles Center Rotary Club (News (Skokie), January 6, 1950, p. 8, News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 65 / Niles Center Press, December 15, 1939, p. 1 / Skokie Review, February 21, 1974, p. 1).

Land for Lee-Wright Park is purchased. (News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 24).

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1940 to 1949

1940  (March 4)     The Illinois Secretary of State notifies counsel for the Village of Niles Center that the name of "Ridgeview" has been reserved by the Secretary of State for a period of 60 days. (Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

May     Village President George Blameuser earns a monthly salary of $166.67. Each Trustee earns either $3.00 or $6.00. Village Police Chief Ted Heinz earns $185.25 per month.26 (Skokie Life, November 6, 1941, pp. 6-8).

August 9     The "Name Change Committee", comprised of representatives from various civic groups, Mayor Blameuser and trustees, votes from among the following names: Ridgeview, Oakton, Westridge and Skokie. Skokie receives 15 favorable votes and Oakton 4 votes. (Witry, op.cit., pp. 142-45).27

August 21     The Village requests the Illinois Secretary of State to reserve the name "Skokie". (Witry, op.cit. p. 145 / Whittingham, op.cit., 84 / Letter from Mayor George Blameuser dtd August 21, 1941, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

September 5     Petitions urging the Village President and Board of Trustees to adopt the name Skokie are filed with Harold "Holly" Klehm, Village Clerk. (Witry, op.cit., p. 145).

September 5     A petition to change the name of the Village from Niles Center to Skokie is presented the Niles Center Village Board. (Ordinance dtd 10/01/1940, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

September     Rev. Guy Chester Jones becomes the first full-time Pastor at Central Methodist Church. (Ardis Coninx, Central United Methodist Church, op.cit., 3).

October 1     An ordinance adopting the name "Skokie" is adopted by the Village Board by a vote of 6-0. (Witry, op.cit., p. 145 / Chicago Tribune, August 10, 1940, p. 7 / Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 7 / News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 61 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 12 / Niles Center Press, September 27, 1940, p. 1 / Skokie, Illinois Department of Community Development, Planning Section, 1964, p. 5 / Skokie Press28 , October 4, 1940, p. 1 / Whittingham, op.cit., p. 84 / Ordinance dtd 10/01/1940, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

October 9     The Illinois Secretary of State acknowledges receipt of a certification from Village Clerk Harold "Holly" Klehm that the Village Board has adopted an ordinance changing the name of the Village from Niles Center to Skokie. (Copy of Certification, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

November 14     Last day the Village is known as "Niles Center". (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 84).

November 15     First day the Village is known as "Skokie". (Witry, op.cit. p. 145 / Whittingham, op.cit., p. 85).

Skokie has 1,833 homes. (Life (Skokie), sec. 2, July 3, 1969, p. 1).

Market Street is renamed Warren Avenue. (League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood, op.cit., p. 13 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 17).

Chicago Theatre-chain owner, John Balaban, establishes WBKB, Illinois' first television station. (Whitney, op.cit., p. 14).

Among community organizations formed are the Local Council of Girl Scouts (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 87 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 59) and Skokie Sixty Club (Skokie Life, December 4, 1952, p. 1).

1941   (January 6)     In his State of the Union address, President Franklin D. Roosevelt proclaims the "Four Freedoms" - freedom of speech and expression, freedom to worship, freedom from want and freedom from fear. (Morris, op.cit., p. 365).

February     Eleven men are inducted into the army from the Park Ridge District which includes Skokie. (News (Skokie), February 14, 1941, p. 1).

February 22     Dr. Alma Louise Klehm, pioneer woman physician of Niles Township and one of the nation's first women doctors, dies at the age of 70. (News (Skokie), February 28, 1941, p. 1 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 99).

May     District 69 agrees to accept students from District 72 for the sum of $7,000.00 for the first 100 students. If more than 100 students, the rate would be $70.00 per student per year. (Coninx, op.cit. p. 10).

June     Work starts on the $390,000.00 G. D. Searle plant at Niles Avenue and Searle Parkway. It was completed in March,1942. (News (Skokie), June 6, 1941, p. 1 / News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 45 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 53 / Skokie Life, October 27, 1949, p. 3 / Skokie Press, June 6, 1941, p. 1).

August     The Regular Republican Club of Niles Township is founded by D.A. Flynn, Jr., H. Guenther and F. L. Huscher. (The Skokie Press, August 8, 1941, p. 1).

August 5     Ground is broken for Skokie's new post-office to be located at 4915 Oakton Street in a building owned by Clara Blameuser. The old post-office on Lincoln Avenue was severely cramped according to Skokie Postmaster William K. Lyon. (The Skokie Press, August 8, 1941, p. 1).

August 8    Hawkinson Grocery and Market, located at 7926 Lincoln Avenue offeres leg of lamb for 32 per pound. (The Skokie Press, August 8, 1941, p. 3).

October 30     Skokie Art Guild is formed. (Skokie Life, October 30, 1941, p. 3).

October 31 - November 1    Mary Martin and Don Ameche star in "Kiss the Boys Goodbye" at the Skokie Theatre. (Skokie Life, October 30, 1941, p. 12).

November 4     Skokie voters approve a tax supported library. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 13 / News (Skokie), November 7, 1941, p. 1 / Petty, 1960, unp. / Skokie Press, June 6, 1941, p. 1 / Skokie Life, October 30, 1941, p. 1). Ethel Griffin, Carl Hunter, Lottie Babb, Paul Winger, Selma Regan and Richard Cutler are elected "directors" of the Skokie Public Library. (Archives, Skokie Public Library).

November 17.    The recently formed Skokie Art Guild opens its first Art Fair. (A second group of this name was organized in 1961.) (News (Skokie), November 14, 1941, p. 1).

December 5     Building permits issued for Niles Township in the first eleven months of 1941 exceed the half million dollar mark surpassing previous levels. (News (Skokie), December 5, 1941, p. 1).

December 7     Japanese attack Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Gordon Mitchell, who had been a resident of Skokie prior to enlisting, is killed in the attack. (Villager, July 17, 1958, p. 18).

December 8     Congress declares war on Japan. Mayor Blameuser, coordinator of the Skokie Defense Council, issued defense instructions to Village departments and appoints Trustee Ambrose Brod as blackout warden. (News (Skokie), December 12, 1941, p. 1 / Whittingham, op.cit. p. 85).

Construction in the Village totals more than $3,000,000. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 3).

Among community organizations formed are the American Defenders Council of Skokie (Skokie Press, September 12, 1941, p. 1) and the Lions Club of Skokie (Skokie Press, May 9, 1941, p. 1).

December 31     The Niles Center State Bank reports gross assets of $3,078,842.86. (News (Skokie), January 16, 1942, V. 18 - No. 3, p. 8).

1942   (January 1)     Clara Blameuser leases 4913 Oakton Street to the "Board of Directors of the Skokie Free Public Library" for a 5 year term ending December 31, 1946. (Original Lease in the archives of the Skokie Public Library). The Post Office will relocate. (News (Skokie), January 16, 1942, V. 18 - No. 3, p. 1).

January 15    The Jewel Food Store at 8016 Lincoln Avenue re-opens after re-modeling. (News (Skokie), January 16, 1942, V. 18 - No. 3, p. 4).

January 31     The new tax supported library hires Bertha M. Rosche as Librarian. (Archives, Skokie Public Library).

February 27    District 69 adopts new rules and regulations among which is a rule prohibiting the employment of married women as teachers. (Coninx, op.cit. p. 10).

March 18     One hundred forty Skokie Air Raid Wardens meet with Chief Ambrose Brod and organize their defense plans. (Skokie Press, March 20, 1942, p. 1).

June 3 - 6     Battle of Midway Island rages in the Pacific. United States naval forces under the temporary command of Admiral Raymond Spruance sink 4 Japanese aircraft carriers. (Morris, op.cit., p. 370).

October     The Skokie Press reports that Skokiens are planting victory gardens in record numbers. "There is hardly a vacant lot that does not have its rows of beans, carrots, tomatoes and other food plants." In the central victory garden area, 238 families have 678,900 square feet under cultivation. (The Skokie Press, October 9, 1942, p. 4).

October     "Skokie Billiard Hall" operates at 5112 Oakton Street. (The Skokie Press, October 9, 1942, p. 8).

October     St. John's Lutheran Church, 6742 Kilpatrick, is founded. (Skokie Life, October 30, 1952, p. 1).

November 8     United States forces, under the command of General George S. Patton, Jr., land on the Atlantic coast of Morocco. First military strike in the European Theater of Operations. (Morris, op.cit., p. 374).

December 2     A team of scientists, led by Nobel Laureate Enrico Fermi, unleashes the first sustaining nuclear chain reaction beneath the stands at Stagg field on the grounds of the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL. (Encyclopedia Britannica, Multimedia Edition, 1999).

Niles Township census by school districts: District 67 Golf - 1,017 / District 68 Sharp Corner - 1,522 / District 69 Lincoln - 3,645 / District 70 Morton Grove - 1,905 / District 71 Niles - 1,759 / District 72 Fairview - 716 / District 73 East Prairie - 716 / District 731/2 Cleveland - 1,450 / District 74 Lincolnwood - 1,836 / High School District 219 - 4,246. (Skokie Press, July 31, 1942, p. 1).

1943    The Mayer Paving Company starts business at 7300 North St. Louis in Skokie. (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 59).

March 1     The Rationing Point Program goes into effect. People register for War Ration Book #2 in Niles Township. (News (Skokie), January 15, 1943, p. 1 / Skokie Press, February 26, 1943, p. 1).

Summer     The Village supports Victory Gardens by supplying tractors to do free plowing. (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 1 / Skokie Press, April 30, 1943, p. 1).

Norman Rockwell, America's preeminent illustrator, depicts the "Four Freedoms" proclaimed by President Roosevelt in his 1941 State of the Union address. They first appear in the Saturday Evening Post and are later used in War Bond Drives to raise money for the war effort. (Norman Rockwell Illustrator, Arthur Guptill, Watson-Guptill Publications, American Heritage Press, New York, 1946, p. 140).

Among community organizations formed are the Skokie Valley Post 3854, Veterans of Foreign Wars (photograph of opening ceremony) (News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 32 / News (Skokie), January 26, 1939, p. 1) and the Skokie Youth Organization (Skokie Press, December 17, 1943, p. 1).

1944  (June 6)    Allied forces, under the command of General Dwight D. Eisenhower, land on the coast of Normandy, France. (Chicago Tribune, June 7, 1944, p. 1).

September     Marjorie Wedell is hired as a teacher by District 69 at the rate of $165.00 per month. (Coninx, op.cit. p. 10).

October     The Skokie Community Chest is formed. (Skokie Press, October 13, 1944, p. 1).

December 16     German troops launch the "Ardennes" counter-offensive along a north-south line extending from Belgium to Luxembourg. (Morris, op.cit., p. 378)

December 26     The Belgium town of Bastogne, surrounded by German Army troops, is relieved by elements of the 4th Armored Division, 3rd Army, Gen. G.S. Patton, Jr. commanding. (Morris, op.cit., p. 378 / Martin Blumenson, The Patton Papers, 1940-45, V. II, Houghton Miflin Company, Boston, MA., 1974, p. 607).

1945    The Skokie American Legion Post 320 acquires the "Swedish Castle" at 8212 Lincoln. (News (Skokie)*, July 3, 1963, p. 100 / Skokie Press, January 25, 1946, p. 1).

April     John W. Wuerth is elected the 8th Village President. (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 113).

July 10     The Village Board adopts a resolution allowing the Culligan Zeolite Company of Northbrook to use Skokie streets north of Dempster and east of Skokie Boulevard to dry their product. (Skokie Press, July 20, 1945, p. 1).

August 6    The first atomic bomb is dropped by United States forces on Hiroshima. (Morris, op.cit., p. 373).

August     The Playcraft Company comes to Skokie. (Skokie Press, August 16, 1945, p. 1).

August 9     The second atomic bomb is dropped on Nagasaki. (Morris, op.cit., p. 373).

August 14     The Japanese military government accepts the Allied terms for surrender. (Morris, op.cit., p. 373). All business in the community is halted as Skokie celebrates VJ day. (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 114 / Skokie Press, August 16, 1945, p. 1).

November 20     The Skokie Village Board passes an ordinance creating the Playground and Recreation Board which is to provide recreational opportunities for its citizens. (Skokie Press, November 23, 1945, p. 1).

Among community organizations formed are

         Republican Club of Skokie (Skokie Press, December 21, 1945, p. 1)

         Skokie Valley Choral Club (Skokie Press, January 19, 1945, p. 1).

1946    Consolidated Lutheran School for Niles Township is established. (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 42 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 63).

The Skokie Ladies Auxiliary to the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Post 3854, is established. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 5 / News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 33 / News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 16A).

The American Legion Skokie Post 320 assumes sponsorship of the Skokie Indians Drum and Bugle Corps. (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 110 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, pp. 4, 100).

May     The Skokie Village Master Plan is adopted, emphasizing single family units over apartments. (News (Skokie), June 10, 1954, p. 3 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, pp. 3, 4).

May     Industries of Skokie, Morton Grove and vicinity are limited to operating 24 hours a week because of the electricity shortage caused by the coal strike. (Skokie Press, May 10, 1946, p. 1).

The Skokie Park District conducts a referendum to authorize increased bonding authority for the purpose of purchasing new park sites. The referendum is defeated. (History of the Skokie Park District, p. 10, Archives, Skokie Park District).

The Niles Center State Bank receives its national banking charter and becomes known as the First National Bank of Skokie.

Some of the new businesses locating in Skokie during 1946 are J. Marsh Corporation, Howard & St. Louis Avenues (Skokie Press, October 24, 1946, p. 1), Madison Steel Company, 4901 Main Street (News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 22), Naxon Utilities Corp., on the block bounded by Touhy, Jarvis, Central Park and St. Louis (Skokie Press, March 15, 1946, p. 1), Skokie Lumber Company, 4810 Oakton Street (Skokie Press, May 24, 1946, p. 1), Radiad Services, Inc., 9225 Laramie (News (Skokie), September 9, 1965, sec. 2, p. 14).

1947    The Westminister Church is organized with Rev. Robert Lee Sawyier as pastor. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 57 / Skokie Press, April 18, 1947, p. 1).

June 16     The Skokie chapter of the Eastern Star is founded. (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 34).

June 20     Former Skokie Police Chief Ted Heinz pleads guilty to the charge of "malfeasance of office". (Skokie Press, June 27, 1947, p. 1).

June 26     Skokie Village President John Wuerth resigns. (Skokie Press, June 27, 1947, p. 1).

July 3     Arthur Simmons is appointed to succeed John Wuerth as Village President. (Skokie Press, July 11, 1947, p. 1).

September     Plate lunches at Lincoln School cost 25 and milk costs 3 (Coninx, op. cit.).

September 13     Armed bandits invade Schaeffer's Liquor Store and make off with $2,500.00 and two diamond rings. (The News, September 19, 1947, p. 1).

September 19     Pharmacist W. J. Parker advertizes the return of "Dana's famous perfumes and colognes" at approximately pre-war prices. Parker's Drug Store is located at 7928 Lincoln Avenue just north of the Skokie Theater. (The News, September 19, 1947, p. 2).

September 19-20     Skokie Theater, Jack Berglin proprietor, is showing Ronald Reagen and Zachary Scott starring in "Stallion Road". (The News, September 19, 1947, p. 2).

A Bell Laboratories team consisting of John Bardeen, Walter H. Brittain and William B. Shockley invent the transistor. In 1956, they will be awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics. (Encyclopedia Britannica, Multimedia Edition, 1999).

1948    The Newcomers Club of Skokie is organized. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 50).

The Village Board accepts bids for construction of a new fire station on Hamlin Avenue and repairs to the Floral Avenue station. (News (Skokie), April 16, 1948, p. 1 / Skokie Press, June 18, 1948, p. 1).

March     CTA rapid transit service to Dempster is interrupted because of a long strike. (Chicago Transit Authority. Research and Planning Department, 1969, p. 7).

July 20     The Village Board authorizes the fire marshall and the police and fire commission to immediately proceed to organize a full time, paid fire department. (News (Skokie), July 23, 1948, p. 1).

August     Cleveland School PTA extends an invitation to District 69 Board members to attend a discussion pertaining to consolidation of school districts. No one from 69 is interested in attending. (Coninx, op.cit. p. 11).

August 16     George Herman "Babe" Ruth dies of throat cancer at the age of 53 in New York City. (Chicago Tribune, August 17, 1948, p. 1).

Fall     The A. B. Dick Company, 5700 Touhy, moves to Skokie. (News (Skokie), June 11, 1948, p. 1).

1949   (April)    George D. Wilson is elected as the 10th Village President. (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 113).29

June 29     Ground is broken for Woodall Industries, Inc., Oakton Street. (Skokie Life, July 15, 1949, p. 1 / Skokie Press, July 1, 1949, p. 3).

June 30     The first annual Ox Roast Festival is sponsored by American Legion Post #320. It runs through July 4. (The News, June 28, 1956, p. 25).

July 19     Skokie Council 3243, Knights of Columbus, is formed. John F. Schoemer is elected first Grand Knight. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 34 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 34 / Buisseret et.al., op.cit. p. 93 / News (Skokie) January 6, 1950, p. 7 / Skokie Life, February 25, 1949, p. 1).

August 16     The Skokie Village Board authorizes a new twenty-five year contract for the purchase of water from Evanston. (News (Skokie), January 6, 1950, p. 7).

October 8     Edens Expressway, an important traffic artery running from the Loop through Skokie, is dedicated. (Skokie Life, October 14, 1969, p. 1 / News (Skokie), January 6, 1950, p. 7).

Some community organizations forming in 1949 are Niles Township Jewish Men's Club (News (Skokie), June 13, 1974, p. 14), Skokie Masonic Lodge No. 1168 (News (Skokie), January 6, 1950, p. 7 / News (Skokie), September 12, 1974, p. 22), Skokie Valley Council of Parent-Teacher Associations (News (Skokie), January 6, 1950, p. 7 / Skokie Life, September 16, 1949, p. 1), Skokie Valley Industrial Association (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 46 / Skokie Life, February 4, 1949, p. 1).

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1950 to 1959

1950  (January)     District 69 serves notice on District 72 that, effective June 30th, it would no longer accept students from District 72 but is later amended to take only 60 pupils. (Coninx, op.cit. p. 11).

August 4     Hughston M. McBain, chairman of the board of Marshall Field and Co., announces that his firm will build a mammoth $15,000,000 to $20,000,000 shopping center in Skokie to be known as Old Orchard. (News (Skokie), August 11, 1950, p. 1 / News (Skokie), January 5, 1951, p. 3 / Skokie Life, August 10, 1950, p. 1 / Skokie Press, August 11, 1950, p. 1.

June     The second wettest June in history is recorded. (U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, op.cit., 1970, p. 32).

July 1     George Savage becomes Superintendent of Education, District 69 succeeding O.O. Young. He serves until 1970. (Coninx, op.cit. p. 11).

September 15     The Skokie Park District purchases a .2 acre site at Crain and Hamlin (Playtime Park). (Archives, Skokie Park District).

November     An election to approve the issuance of bonds to finance another addition to Lincoln School passes. (Coninx, op.cit. p. 12).

Skokie population is 14,752 per 1950 census. (Buisseret, et.al., op. cit., p. 93 / The News, February 3, 1955 / Prairie State: Impressions of Illinois. Paul M. Angle, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1968, p. 491 / Nonwhite population changes in Chicago's suburbs. Illinois Commission on Human Relations, 1962, p. 7).

Trinity Lutheran Church moves from Evanston to 3637 Simpson in Skokie. (Skokie Life, July 5, 1951, p. 1).

Among the community organizations founded are:

         Junior Woman's Club (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 38e / Skokie Life, November 16, 1950, p. 1 / Skokie Press, October 26, 1950, p. 1)

         Niles Township Jewish Community Club (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 34)

         Skokie Valley Chapter of the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America (Skokie Life, November 16, 1950, p. 1)

         Skokie Valley Shrine Club (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 59)

Some new businesses locating in Skokie are:

         Hirsch Manufacturing Company, Central Park (Skokie Press, May 5, 1950, p.1)

         International Minerals and Chemical Corporation, Harrison Street (Skokie Press, December 22, 1950, p.1)

         Portland Cement Association Research Labs, located at 5420 Old Orchard Rd.(formerly Harrison Street)(News (Skokie), January 5, 1951, p. 3, Skokie Life, September 30, 1949, p. 1)

         Silver Skillet Brands, 7450 St. Louis (News (Skokie), February 3, 1950, p.1)

         Synchro-Start Products, 8151 Ridgeway (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 47)

1951  (January 16)     The Village makes a small appropriation for the Civil Defense Program as was advised by Skokie's new Civil Defense Organization. (News (Skokie), January 19, 1951, pp. 1, 8 / Skokie Press, January 19, 1951, p. 1).

February 12     School Board members open bids for construction of a $468,000 school in Fairview School District 72. (News (Skokie), February 16, 1951, p. 1 ).

March 6     The Skokie Park District purchases a 1.3 acre site at Hull and Terminal Avenues (Tecumseh Park). (Archives, Skokie Park District).

June 13     The first official meeting of the Civil Defense Corps Warden Service of Skokie is held. (Skokie Press, June 22, 1951, p. 1).

July 2    St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church is formed. (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 146 / Buisseret, et.al., op.cit., p. 94).

September    St. Lambert Catholic church is formed. Rev. Francis J. Trainor is pastor. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 11 / News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p.38 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 44 / Skokie Press, March 20, 1952, p. 1 / Whittingham, op.cit., p. 146 / Buisseret, et.al., op.cit.p. 94).

September    Enrollment in School District 73 approximates 115 students with a teaching staff numbering 5. (The History of East Prairie School, Archives, Skokie Historical Society, 1983.44.14).

October     The Orchard School for Retarded Children (also called the School for Mentally Retarded of Niles Township and School for Retarded Children) was opened with Julia Molloy as director. (News (Skokie), November 2, 1951, p. 5 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 24).

December 20     Edens Expressway, a major highway running north from Chicago through Skokie, is opened. (News (Skokie), December 21, 1951, p. 1 / Skokie Life, December 20, 1951, p. 1 / Skokie Press, December 1951, p. 1).

Skokie voters pass a referendum enabling the Skokie Park District to levy a recreation tax for the purpose of offering recreational programming. The Village of Skokie transfers recreation programming to the Park District. (Archives, Skokie Park District, History of the Skokie Park District, p. 10).

St. Timothy Lutheran Church is formally opened. Rev. William A. Diehl is pastor. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 96).

Among community organizations formed are:

         Garden Club of Skokie (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p.38c / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 74 / News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 16 / Skokie Life, November 23, 1951, p. 1)

         Niles Township High School Parent Teacher Assoc., (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 92 / Skokie Life, February 1, 1951, p. 1)

         Loyal Order of Moose, Skokie Lodge No. 376 (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 104 / Skokie Press, August 31, 1951, p. 1, September 14, 1951, p. 1)

         Skokie Valley Community Concert Association (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 72 / Skokie Life, October 18, 1951, p. 1 / Skokie Press, October 19, 1951, p. 1)

Some new businesses locating in Skokie are:

         Croname, Inc., Touhy Avenue (Skokie Press, September 28, 1951, p. 1)

         General Controls, 8080 McCormick (Skokie Press, January 12, 1951, p. 1)

         Powers Regulator Company, 3400 Oakton Street (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 57)

         Teletype Corporation, 5555 Touhy Avenue (News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 52)

         W.M. Welsh Mfg. Co., McCormick and Oakton (Skokie Press, February 23, 1951, p. 1)

1952   Niles Township Jewish Congregation is formed under the spiritual leadership of Rabbi Sidney Jacobs. The first Jewish service is held in Niles Township in May, 1952, at the Skokie Village Hall. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 62 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 60 / Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 27 / Skokie Life, April 3, 1952, p. 1).

Skokie begins to receive its drinking water through Evanston's lakefront plant. (Villager, June 26, 1958, p. 15).

Spring     Central Methodist Church breaks ground for its new church building. (Ardis Coninx, Central United Methodist Church, op.cit., 4).

September     District 69 opens for classes. Lincoln school opens with 12 new classrooms, a shop, library, multi-purpose room and cafeteria for this school year. 1,103 children attend Lincoln from K thru 8th. The building is dedicated on November 9th. (Coninx, op.cit. "Information on Lincoln School", p. 3).

October 6     The first Niles Township Community Chest campaign starts. (News (Skokie), October 2, 1952. p. 1).

October 6     Classes begin at the new building for the School for Retarded Children at the Chamber of Commerce on Lincoln Avenue. (News (Skokie), October 2, 1952. p. 13).

October 25     Dial telephone service comes to Skokie, Morton Grove and Lincolnwood. (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 53 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 99 / "Skokie and the Telephone", Illinois Bell Telephone, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

Skokie leads the suburbs in apartment construction. (Sunday Life (Skokie), sec. 1-A, January 17, 1971, p. 8).

The first regular services of the Skokie Valley Baptist church are held. (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 34).

Among community organizations formed are:

         Niles Township Regular Republican Women's Organization (Skokie Life, September 25, 1952, p. 1)

         Women of the Moose, Skokie Chapter 1329 (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 33 / Skokie Life, March 27, 1952, p. 1)

Some new business locating in Skokie are:

         Allstate Insurance Company, 7447 Skokie Blvd., (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 45, September 9, 1965, p. 13, January 16, 1975, p. 19 / Skokie Life, August 16, 1951, p. 1, January 17, 1952, p. 1)

         Coats and Clark, Inc., 8220 Skokie Blvd., (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 46)

         Engraved Products Company, 8020 Lawndale, (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 24)

         Fel-Pro, Inc., 7450 McCormick (News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 23)

         Radiation Counter Labs, Inc., 5122 Grove Street (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 55)

         Rand McNally & Co., 8255 Central Park (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 49, January 16, 1975, p. 16b / Skokie Press, May 24, 1946, p. 1)

         Ravenswood Tile Co., 5325 Touhy (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 100)

1953  (January 9)     The League of Women Voters of Skokie-Lincolnwood (photograph of League Booklet) is organized. Mrs. D.R. Beaman is first president. (1973-74 Handbook, Archives, Diana Hunter).

January 27     The Skokie Park District purchases a 5 acre site at Lorel and Cleveland Avenues. (Archives, Skokie Park District).

February 15     The last church service is held in the old log cabin structure which served Central Methodist Church since 1931. (Ardis Coninx, Central United Methodist Church, op.cit., 2).

February 22     The first church service is held in the new Central Methodist Church. (Ardis Coninx, Central United Methodist Church, op.cit., p. 4).

July 7     The Village Board passes Skokie's first million dollar appropriations ordinance for the fiscal year ending April 30, 1954. (News (Skokie), July 9, 1953, p. 3).

August 1     An election is held to authorize the purchase and construction of a new school in the northern part of District 69. The referendum passes. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 12).

September     Marjorie Wedell is appointed Principal of Lincoln School. (Coninx,op.cit., p. 12).

September 20     Martin "Scotty" Krier's Skokie Indians semi-pro baseball team wins the Midwest Semipro Baseball league championship by beating the Berwyn Olympic Savings team 9-4. The game was played at Oakton Park. (Skokie Life, September 24, 1953, p. 1).

St. Lambert Catholic school is established. (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 38).

Among community organizations formed are:

         League of Women Voters of Skokie (later Skokie-Lincolnwood) (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 92 / News (Skokie), July 11, 1963, p. 4)

         National Council of Jewish Women, Evanston-Niles Township Section (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 29 / News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 13)

Some new business locating in Skokie are:

         A.I.T. Industries, 8221 Kimball (News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 38)

         Mancuso Chevrolet, 8130 Lincoln Avenue (Skokie Review, April 10, 1969, p. 52)

         Ohmite Manufacturing Co., 3601 Howard (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 48)

         Quick Set, Inc., 8121 Central Park (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 57 / Skokie Life, January 2, 1953, p. 1)

1954  (February 20)     Residents of District 72 approve bond issues to build a new Fairview School and an addition to the existing one. (News (Skokie), February 25, 1954, p. 3).

March 5     District 69 voters approve a bond referendum to construct a new school in the western part of the district. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 13).

April 16    James Stewart & June Allyson star in "The Glenn Miller Story" at the Skokie Theater. (The Life, April 15, 1954, p. 5).

May 17     The United States Supreme Court decides "Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas" which holds that "separate but equal" educational facilities are inherently unequal. (Encyclopedia Britannica, Multimedia Edition, 1999).

June     St. Joan of Arc Church is dedicated. (Life (Skokie)*, sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 11 / News (Skokie), December 30, 1954, p. 27 / Skokie Life, July 5, 1951, p. 1).

August     Niles Township High School District 219 approves a $300,000 bond referendum for the purchase of 56 acres of land on Oakton and Major for a second high school. (News (Skokie), August 5, 1954, p. 3 / News (Skokie), January 24, 1963, p. 34).

September     Evanshire Presbyterian Church moves to Skokie. (News (Skokie), December 30, 1954, p. 27).

September     Jane Stenson School opens with six rooms, a multi-purpose room, an office area and two hundred students. (Jane Stenson School History.)

October 19     Fifty-six acres of land south of Lunt and west of Carpenter Rd. are dis-annexed by the Village of Skokie. The land is expected to be annexed by the City of Chicago for the purpose of the construction of a hospital to be operated by the Sisters of Mercy and owned by Loyola University. (Olcott's Land Values & Zoning, 1965 p. 21/ Skokie Life, October 21, 1954, p. 1/ News (Skokie), October 21, 1954, p. 1 / News (Skokie), June 28, 1956, p. 4 / The Geographical Growth of Skokie, Illinois. Joseph C. Beaver, Skokie, 1983.)30

December 20    402 parking meters are installed in downtown Skokie to discourage "all-day" parking. (The News, January 13, 1955, p. 26).

Ray Kroc opens his first McDonalds restaurant in Des Plaines. (Whitney, op.cit., p. 15).

Among community organizations formed are:

         Congregation Bnai Emunah Sisterhood (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, pp. 18, 38)

         Skokie Business and Professional Women's Club (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 26)

         Skokie Valley Kiwanis Club (News (Skokie), December 30, 1954, p. 27, July 3, 1963. p. 13)

         Toastmaster's Club of Skokie (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 112)

Skokie is the leading home builder in value of new construction in all the Chicago area. (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 7 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 3).

Temple Judea of Niles Township, Reformed Synagogue, is formed with Rabbi Karl Weiner as its spiritual leader. (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 116 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 57 / News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 45).

There is a large flood on the North Branch of the Chicago River. (U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, op.cit., p. 3).

There are 296 retail outlets in Skokie and a special census reveals 23,704 population. (The News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 109).

Congregation Bnai Emunah, Conservative Synagogue, is founded with Rabbi Melvin Goldstine as its spiritual leader. (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 116 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 3).

Hodag Chemical Corporation opens its headquarters at 7247 Central Park. (News (Skokie), sec. 2, September 9, 1965, p. 4).

1955  (January)     Marjorie Wedell is appointed principal of the new Kenton School. Ms. Ola Kemp is appointed principal of Lower Lincoln (K-5) and Ralph Johnson is appointed principal of Upper Lincoln (6-8). (Coninx, op.cit., p. 13).

January 12     Marshall Field & Co. announces that its proposed Old Orchard store will have 285,000 square feet of retail shopping space. Other retailers which have announced plans to locate in Old Orchard are 1) The Fair with 106,000 square feet 2) S.S. Kresge with 35,000 square feet 3) C.D. Peacock Jewelry Co. with 5,000 square feet. (Women's Wear Daily, Wednesday, January 12, 1955 - Archives, Skokie Chamber of Commerce).

February 10     An ad in The News reveals the following merchants:

         Urbanus Service Station at 7953 Lincoln Avenue

         Jim Devines Service Station at 3550 Dempster Street

         Betty's Beauty Salon at 4907 Oakton Street

         Skokie Engineers for Television at 4447 Oakton Street

         Skokie Camera Shop at 8002 Lincoln Avenue

         Mars Studio of Dance and Theatre Acts at 5112 Oakton Street

         Midwest Academy of Music at 8810 Bronx Avenue

         Skokie Valley Children's Theater and Dramatic School at 5112 Oakton Street

(The News, February 10, 1955).

March 17     An ad in The News reveals the following merchants are located at the following locations in downtown Skokie:

         Allison's House of Music at 4935 Oakton Street

         Al's Auto Parts at 8118 Lincoln

         Dennis Clothes for Men at 7935 Lincoln

         Forest Furniture at 5007 Oakton

         Furs by Charles at 7941 Lincoln

         Happ's Shoes at 5003 Oakton Street

         Hob Craft at 7951 Niles Avenue

         Jay's Shoes at 5021 Oakton Street

         Arnold Leonard, Inc. at 5023 Oakton

         Margies, Inc. at 5001Oakton

         Playroom Juvenile Stores at 5107 Oakton

         Raymond's Work-N-Sport at 7914 Lincoln

         Robert's Dept. Store, Inc. at 8016 Lincoln

         Skokie Hobby House at 8122 Lincoln

         Skokie Paint & Wallpaper at 5118 Oakton

         Ben Franklin Store at 5011 Oakton

         Paroubek's Community Bakery at 8044 Lincoln Avenue

         Consumer's Millinery at 7946 Lincoln Avenue

         Dieden's Smart Shop at 5041 Oakton Street

         Eberhardt's Gift Nook at 8023 Lincoln

         Goldberg's Delicatessen at 7933 Lincoln

         Jack 'N Jill Shoes at 7931 Lincoln

         Larry's Men's & Boy's Shop at 5039 Oakton

         Longtin's Sports Huddle & S'quire Shop at 4901 Oakton

         Martin E. Pendergast, Stationer at 4931 Oakton

         Mode O'Day Frock Shop at 5017 1/2 Oakton

         National Tea Company at 4949 Oakton

         Nelson's Bakeries at 4947 Oakton

         Poultryland USA at 7939 Lincoln

         Robinson's Bakery at 8015 Lincoln

         Roxanne Petites Modes at 5111 Brown

         Selz Bootery at 7948 Lincoln

         Ace Hardware at 5035 Oakton

         Skokie Bootery at 8038 Lincoln

         Skokie Department Store at 8045 Lincoln

         Skokie Jewelers at 5105 Oakton

         Skokette Shop at 8017 Lincoln

         Skokie Variety Store at 8008 Lincoln

         Thiemann Paint & Wallpaper at 4925 Oakton

         Tomsik Hardware at 8034 Lincoln

         Weil's Womens Apparel at 5047 Oakton

         Western Tire Auto Store at 5018 Oakton

         Wolke & Schack Dept. Store at 4937 Oakton

(News (Skokie), March 17, 1955, p. 17).

March 30     Ground is broken for the Marshall Field & Company store at Old Orchard. (News (Skokie), April 7, 1955).31

April 18     Albert Einstein dies in his sleep in Princeton, N.J. (Encyclopedia Britanica, Multimedia Edition, 1999).

May 20    The Evanshire United Presbyterian Church is established as a congregation of the Presbyterian Church. (News (Skokie), May 15, 1975, p. 12).

June 30     Ground breaking ceremonies are held for the new Orchard School for Retarded Children on the triangular block of land bounded by Conrad, Lockwood and Gross Point Road. It will be dedicated in the fall. (Life of Niles Township, April 19, 1956, p. 1 / News (Skokie), June 30, 1955, p. 4).

July 19     The Skokie Village Board votes to collect a cent sales tax commencing September 1. (Life of Niles Township, July 21, 1955, p. 1 / News (Skokie), July 21, 1955, p. 3).

August     George Blameuser, Armond King and Asher Goldfine announce plans to change the character of Oakton Street from the Northwestern tracks to Niles Avenue from residential to commercial. (News (Skokie), August 11, 1955, p. 3)

August 18     The Jacob Heinz home at 8140 Lincoln Avenue is razed. It was built by Heinz in 1871. (News (Skokie), July 21, 1955, p. 1).32

September     Approximately 19,000 children, a record number, attend Niles Township Schools. (News (Skokie), August 25, 1955, p. 3).

September 1     Skokie begins collecting a cent sales tax which is expected to generate approximately $140,000.00 in revenue to the Village. (The News, July 21, 1955, p. 1).

September 22     A News editorial calls for the establishment of an Institute of Human Relations to combat the growing problem of ethnic prejudice in the community. (News (Skokie), September 22, 1955, pp. 1, 15).

September 27     District 69 dedicates Kenton School. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 13).

October 10     The Skokie Indian Drum and Bugle Corps (sponsored by American Legion Post 320) wins its first national championship in the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida. (News (Skokie), October 13, 1955, p. 3 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 100).

October 31    Orchard School for Retarded Children's new campus at Lockwood and Gross Point Rd. is dedicated by Skokie builder Ben Sears and Gov. William Stratton. The school was previously located in a small redwood building at 8221 Lincoln Avenue on property owned by the Skokie Chamber of Commerce. (Skokie Review, November 3, 1955 (picture) / The News, October 20, 1955).

November     A referendum is passed to spend $1,755,000 to purchase and develop Skokie park sites. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, pp. 71-72 / Skokie News, December 29, 1955, pp. 3-4). The following park sites are purchased and developed:

         Chippewa - .3 acres

         Devonshire - 13 acres

         Frontage n/k/a Peccia Park - 2.5 acres

         Gross Point - 5 acres

         Laramie - 11.6 acres

         Lockwood - 5 acres

         McNally - 5.3 acres

         Menominee - .5 acres

         Mulford - 1.2 acres

         Navajo - 6 acres

         Pawnee - .3 acres

         Seneca - 1.2 acres

         Sequoya - 1.7 acres

         Shabonee - 1.2 acres

         Shawnee - .8 acres

         Timber Ridge - 4 acres

         Winnebago - .8 acres

(History of the Skokie Park District, p. 10, Archives, Skokie Park District).

December 11     Middleton School is dedicated. (News (Skokie), December 8, 1955, p. 3).

There are 181 industries or industrial services in Niles Township. (News (Skokie), February 3, 1955, p. 109).

The Skokie Valley Chapter of the YMCA is chartered. (Life of Niles Township, April 7, 1955, p. 1).

The O. C. Keckley Company moves to Skokie. (Skokie Review, April 11, 1974, p. 5).

1956  (January 17)     11 acre tract located at the NE corner of Touhy and Carpenter Rd. (Niles Center Rd.) is rezoned from residential to commercial for the purpose of constructing a 40 lane bowling alley, dance hall, swimming pool and ice skating rink. (Chicago Sun-Times, February 27, 1956, pp. 1,4).

January     In response to zoning changes believed to undermine property values, Bernard Harrison, G. Raymond Jackson, Frank Hall, Ken Littrell and Jean Doney form a new political party called the Caucus Party. (Life (Skokie), January 17, 1957, p. 1 / Life (Skokie), January 24, 1957, p. 1 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 69).

January 26     Western Union opens a Skokie office. (News (Skokie), January 26, 1956, p. 11).

February     Mr. Doyle McLaughlin is appointed the principal of the new Edison School. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 13).

February 16     Human Relations Council, sponsored by the Niles Township Minister's Association is formed. (News (Skokie), January 7, 1960, p. 50) / Skokie News, February 16, 1956, p. 3).

February 21     Skokie Village Board of Trustees renames Harms Avenue after Trustee Miles Babb. (News (Skokie), February 23, 1956).

March     Joseph J. Hansen announces that the State of Illinois has issued a permit to organize a new bank to be known as "Skokie Trust & Savings Bank" to be located in a two story building at the NW corner of Oakton and Kostner. Hansen announced that the bank would be capitalized in the amount of $525,000.00. (News (Skokie), March 15, 1956, p. 15.) Among the organizers are: David R. Jones

         Marshall S. Stevens

         Sherman E. Pate

         Donald H. Graham

         Howard L. Carnahan

         James Kinsey

         W.L. Erwin

         J. Siewert, Jr.

         Robert Ziegler

         Edward E. McCabe

         Joseph J. Hansen

         Marguerite Hansen

         John Bauer

         Dr. Sam Li Vaccari

         John Sebby

         J. Lawrence Rose

         George Safranski

         Alfred Schmidt

         George Safranski

         Aflred Schmidt

         George Koretos

         Richard Frankel

         Sam J. Barranco

(Skokie Review, March 22, 1956 / Life of Niles Township, July 19, 1956, p. 1 / News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 50 / Niles Township Press, January 21, 1957, p. 1).

April     Membership at Central Methodist Church reaches 1,174. Rev. John Hager is Pastor. (Ardis Coninx, Central United Methodist Church, op.cit., 5).33

April     Jewel opens a new store at 4335 Oakton Street. (News (Skokie), March 29, 1956, p. 32).

April 5     Federal Home Loan Bank Board conducts a hearing in Washington, D.C. regarding the application for the issuance of a permit to organize a federally insured savings and loan association. Among the organizers are:

         Horace Russell

         Allan A. Weissburg

         R.C. Wieboldt, Jr.

         Robert W. Kendler

         Joseph R. Urbanus

         George D. Wilson

         Roland R. Moore

         Frank A. Maierhofer

         Dennis E. Rivelli

         Sidney H. Godell

         Herman J. Giannini

         John R. O'Connell

(Skokie Review, March 22, 1956).

April 17     The citizens of the Village of Skokie, at an election held for the purpose, reject, by a vote of 5,192 to 1,348, application of the "City Election Act" to future elections. (Copy of Court Order entered April 18, 1956, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

May     Central Methodist Church breaks ground for its Church School. (Ardis Coninx, Central United Methodist Church, op.cit., 5).

May 15     Ground breaking ceremonies are held for Niles Township's second high school. (News (Skokie), May 17, 1956, p. 3).

June 14     The Nilehi Faculty Club is disbanded by its members and replaced by Local 1274, Niles Township Federation of Teachers, AFL. (Life of Niles Township, June 1, 1956, p. 1 / News (Skokie), January 7, 1960, p. 50 / News (Skokie), June 14, 1956, p. 3).

June 30     The 8th Annual Ox Roast Festival is sponsored by American Legion Post #320, Ladies Auxiliary and Drum and Bugle Corps. Runs through July 4. ( News (Skokie), June 28, 1956, p. 25).

July     Rev. Ray Bond assumes Pastorate at Central Methodist Church. (Ardis Coninx, Central United Methodist Church, op.cit., 5).

June 28     McDonald's advertises the "gala opening" of its newest most modern drive-in at Dempster & Niles Center Rd. Telephone Or 4 - 1370 for pick-up orders. (News (Skokie), June 28, 1956, p. 32).

July 8     Loyola Academy breaks ground for its new campus at Lake Street and Edens Expressway in Wilmette. (News (Skokie), June 28, 1956, p. 29).

August 31     Bertha Rosche Head Librarian of the Skokie Public Library since 1937, retires. Mary Radmacher is hired to become Head Librarian. (Life Newspaper, July, 1956, p. 1 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 17 / Petty, 1960, unp).

September     The Skokie Indians Drum and Bugle Corps wins its second national championship. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 100 / News (Skokie), September 6, 1956, p. 3).

September 1     Karl Schmidt is hired as Executive Director of the Skokie Chamber of Commerce succeeding Gene Denning. (The Life, August 2, 1956).

September 25     District 69 dedicates the new Thomas A. Edison School, 8200 Gross Point Road. (Life of Niles Township, September 20, 1956, p. 1).

October     Old Orchard Shopping Center opens. (Life of Niles Township, October 25, 1956, p. 1 / News (Skokie), suppl. October 24, 1957, p. 4).

Ground breaking ceremonies are held for the Hebrew Theological College, 7135 Carpenter. (News (Skokie), January 7, 1960, p. 50).

The Niles Township Real Estate Board, later the North Suburban Real Estate Board, is chartered. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 35).

The Skokie Valley Traditional Synagogue Sisterhood is organized. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 52).

Temple Bnai Emunah's facade is bombed in a Halloween prank. (News (Skokie), January 7, 1960, p. 50).

1957  (January 2)     Skokie Federal Savings and Loan opens just south of the intersection of Lincoln and Oakton on the west side of the street. (Life of Niles Township, July 6, 1956, p. 1 / News (Skokie), August 24, 1967, p. 14 / News (Skokie), October 4, 1973, p. 2 / News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 41 / Niles Township Press, January 21, 1957, p. 1).

February 24    Central Methodist Church dedicates its new church school. (Ardis Coninx, Central United Methodist Church, op.cit., 5).

April 16     Skokie becomes the thirtieth village in the Chicago area to implement the village manager form of government. The vote is 8,681 votes in favor of the proposition and 6,438 votes against. (Life (Skokie), April 18, 1957, p. 1 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, pp. 52, 69 / Skokie News, April 18, 1957, pp. 3, 6 / Copy of Village of Skokie Resolution dtd April 20, 1957, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

April 16     Ambrose Reiter is elected the 12th Village President. (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 112).

June 1     A new building for the Police Department opens at Main and Lincoln at a cost of $456,000. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 7).

September 15     The Skokie Indians Drum and Bugle Corps wins an unprecedented third national championship at Atlantic City, New Jersey. (Life (Skokie), September 19, 1957, p. 1 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 100 / Niles Township Press, September 23, 1957, p. 1 / News (Skokie), September 19, 1957, p. 3)

October 4     Sputnik I is launched by the Soviet Union. It circles the earth every 96 minutes. The space race begins. (Encyclopedia Britannica, Multimedia Edition, 1999).

December     The Library institutes bookmobile service. (Archives, Skokie Public Library / Petty, 1960, unp.).

December 8     St. Luke's United Church of Christ is organized. (News (Skokie), May 26, 1960, p. 30).

December     District 69 sells the former site of the Niles Center Public School, 4950 Madison Street to the Federal Government for redevelopment as a Post Office. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 13).

Among community organizations formed are:

         Women's American ORT: Grove, Prairie and Skokie Chapters (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 53)

         Women's Interfaith Alliance of Niles Township (Life (Skokie), March 7, 1957, p. 1)

Tree spraying is started in the Village. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 29).

Eleven property owners associations exist in the Village. They are: Northwest, North Central, Northeast, College Hill, Timber Ridge, West Skokie, Crawford-McCormick, East Side, Fairview, Fairview North and Lorel Park. (Niles Township Press, January 28, 1957, p. 1).

The Chicago Seven-Up Bottling Company moves to Howard and Hamlin in Skokie. (Niles Township Press, June 3, 1957, p. 1).

Village President George Wilson dies. Allan Weisburg is appointed President to fullfill the balance of Wilson's term. (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 112 - 13).

Old Orchard Bank and Trust opens at the NW corner of the shopping center. (Life (Skokie), January 24, 1957, p. 1).

The Skokie Park District constructs the Devonshire Park Community Center. (Archives, Skokie Park District).

The Evangelical and Reformed Church merges with the Congregational Christian Church. The new denomination becomes the United Church of Christ. St. Peter's Evangelical Lutheran Church becomes St. Peter's United Church of Christ. (Our Heritage Rings for Progress, op.cit.).

1958  (February 11)    Skokie voters pass an $8000.00 bond referendum to construct a new library building at 5215 Oakton Street. (Archives, Skokie Public Library / Skokie Review, July 16, 1958, p. 1).

April     Skokie Chamber of Commerce moves into its new headquarters located at 8322 Lincoln Avenue, Skokie. (Archives, Skokie Chamber of Commerce).

June 23     A fund drive is started to benefit the Skokie Valley Community Hospital to be built at the corner of Gross Point and Golf. (News (Skokie), June 26, 1958, p. 3 / Villager, June 26, 1958, p. 5).

July 1     The YMCA acquires Ilg Park, with its famous replica of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, at 6200 Touhy, for the Skokie Valley YMCA. (Villager, June 19, 1958, pp. 5-6).

July 28     Ground breaking ceremonies are held for the Oakview Junior High School at Oakton and East Prairie. (News (Skokie), August 7, 1958, p. 1).

September     Niles Township High School West opens. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 43 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 10 / Niles Township Press, September 29, 1958, p. 1 / News (Skokie), October 16, 1958, p. 34).

The first Old Orchard Art Fair is held. (Sunday Star, September 10, 1961, p. 1).

Jack Kilby of Texas Instruments Corporation develops the concept of integrating device and circuit elements onto a single platform. The integrated circuit is born laying the groundwork for the creation of the computer chip industry. (Encyclopedia Britannica, Multimedia Edition, 1999).

1959  (January 20)     Skokiens oppose the suggestion to change from village to city status. (News (Skokie), January 15, 1959, p. 3 / Niles Township Press, January 19, 1959, p. 1 / Villager, January 22, 1959, p. 5).

April 7     Skokie Civic Party (Skokie Caucus Party) overwhelms the traditional Democratic-Republican backed United Party in Village elections, heralding whole-hearted support for the village manager form of government. (Life (Skokie), April 9, 1959, p. 1 / News (Skokie), April 9, 1959, p. 3).

September 26     A severe storm hits northeast Skokie, damaging among other things, ten 34,000 volt transmission lines. (Life (Skokie), October 1, 1959, p. 1/ News (Skokie), October 1, 1959, p. 3).

September 26     The Chicago White Sox defeat the Cleveland Indians 4-2 to win their first American League pennant since the Black Sox scandal in 1919. (Chicago Tribune, September 27, 1959).34

November 15     Oakview Junior High School is dedicated at 8000 East Prairie. (Life (Skokie), November 12, 1959, p. 1 / News (Skokie), * July 3, 1963, p. 27).

The Luxembourg American Social Club is organized. (Skokie Review, January 4, 1962, p. 3 / Skokie Review, May 7, 1970, p. 56).

The Village supports eight Protestant churches, three Roman Catholic churches and four synagogues. (Chicago's American, January 17, 1959, p. 9).

There are nearly 170 industries employing 10,000 people in the Village. (Chicago's American, January 17, 1959, p. 9).

Robert Noyce of Fairchild Semiconductor Corporation develops the methodology of integrating device and circuit elements onto a single silicon chip. (Encyclopedia Britannica, Multimedia Edition, 1999).

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1960 to 1969

1960  (February 1)     The Skokie Public Library opens its new award winning building at 5215 Oakton moving from its old location at 4913 Oakton Street. (Life (Skokie), April 21, 1960, p. 1 / News (Skokie), January 28, 1960, p. 5 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 17).

February 6     A referendum to build a third Niles Township High School, Niles North, passes. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 43 / News (Skokie), February 11, 1960, p. 1).

June     Skokie Police Chief Louis G. Hennig resigns. His brother, Arthur Hennig, had been indicted by the grand jury in May. Chief Hennig was indicted in late June. (Life (Skokie), February 18, 1960, p. 1 / News (Skokie), February 18, 1960, pp. 3, 5 / News (Skokie), June 9, 1960, p. 1 / News (Skokie), June 30, 1960, p. 1 / Sunday Star, June 12, 1960, p. 1).

June 21     At a special election, the citizens of Skokie vote in favor of establishing a village court to be staffed by two judges. The vote is 2,670 in favor and 540 opposed. (Cert. Copy of Tabulated Statement of Returns dtd December 16, 1960, Archives, Skokie Historical Society / Life (Skokie), Issues of June 23, 1960, p. 1, January 17, 1963, Sec. 3, p. 67/ News (Skokie), Issues of June 23, 1960, p. 1, July 3, 1963, pp. 37, 94 / Sunday Star, January 7, 1962, p. 1).

September     Old Orchard Junior High School opens at 9300 Kenton. (News (Skokie), May 12, 1960, p. 7).

September     The Skokie Department of Engineers is created. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 45).

October     The Skokie Post Office dedicates its new building at 4950 Madison, the former site of the Niles Center Public School. (Life (Skokie), September 29, 1960, p. 1 / Coninx, op.cit., p. 13 / News (Skokie), June 23, 1960, cover / Skokie Review, October 26, 1960, p. 1).

November 6     Fire Station No. 3, located on Gross Point Road north of Dempster Street, is dedicated. (Skokie Fire Dept. Photographs, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

December     Voters elect Irving Goldstein and Harold Sullivan to the new Village Court defeating Simon S. Porter and Joseph J. Witry. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 67 / News (Skokie), June 23, 1960, p. 1 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, pp. 37, 94 / Sunday Star, January 7, 1962, p. 1).

Population of Skokie is 59,364. (Angle, op.cit., p. 491* / Chicago Tribune, July 7, 1963, sec. 10, p. 1 / Nonwhite population changes in Chicago's suburbs. Illinois Commission on Human Relations, op.cit., p. 7 / Skokie, Illinois. Community Development Department, Planning Section, 1964, p. v.).

The first annual Skokie Outdoor Art Fair, sponsored by the downtown merchants of the Skokie Chamber of Commerce is held. (News (Skokie), March 26, 1970, p. 20.

There are 17,165 homes in Skokie. (Skokie Life, sec. 2, July 3, 1969, p. 1).

Direct long distance dialing begins. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 99).

Ten percent of the total number of new homes built in the 129 suburbs of Chicago between 1950 and 1959 were started in Skokie, Morton Grove, Lincolnwood and Niles: 20,082 single family dwellings. (News (Skokie), February 4, 1960, p. 5 / News (Skokie), June 20, 1963, p. 14).

The Skokie Park District constructs the Oakton Community Center and Oakton Park Pool. (History of the Skokie Park District, p. 10, Archives, Skokie Park District).

1961  (March 4)     Township voters approve funds to erect a building for Niles North High School on Lawler Avenue west of Old Orchard Shopping Center. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 43 / News (Skokie), March 9, 1961, p. 3 / Skokie Review, March 9, 1961, p. 1).

March 28     The President and the Board of Trustees of the Village adopt the first revision and codification of the general ordinances since the inception of the Village in 1888. (Municipal Code of the Village of Skokie, Illinois, 1961, unp.).

April     Myron Greisdorf is elected the 13th Village President. (Whittingham, op.cit., p. 113).

April 16    The Chicago Black Hawks win their 3rd Stanley Cup defeating the Detroit Red Wings. (Chicago Tribune, April 17, 1961).

June 13     The Skokie Human Relations Commission is created. (Sunday Star, June 18, 1961, p. 1).

July     Radio Skokie Valley, WRSV-FM, with offices at 3611 Oakton, goes on the air. (News (Skokie), July 13, 1961, p. 1 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 76 / News (Skokie), August 26, 1971, p. 4).

August 1     There are 11,773 single family homes, 571 two flats, 118 three flats, 397 co-ops and 164 townhouses in Skokie. (Skokie Review, September 7, 1961, p. 1).

September     District 69 opens Madison School. (News (Skokie), August 24, 1961, p. 14).

October 10     The Village Board passes an ordinance creating the Skokie Youth Commission. (Sunday Star, October 15, 1961, p. 1).

December     A Village wide discussion ensues over the placement of a Nativity scene on the Village Green. The Village enacts an ordinance permitting displays on the Village Green. (Life (Skokie) / December 7, 1961, p. 1 / News (Skokie), December 7, 1961, p. 3 / Skokie Life, sec. 2, July 3, 1969, p. 1 / Skokie Review, December 7, 1961, p. 3 /Sunday Star, December 3, 1961, p. 1).

December 2     Ground is broken for the Skokie Valley Community Hospital at Gross Point and Golf. (Life (Skokie), December 7, 1961, p. 1 / News (Skokie), November 30, 1961, p. 1 / Skokie Review, November 30, 1961, p. 3 / Sunday Star, December 3, 1961, p. 1).

December 7     At the age of 85, Alma Louise Klehm, pioneer Skokie school teacher, is chosen "cover girl" for the First National Bank's 1962 calendar. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 48 / News (Skokie), December 7, 1961, p. 3 / Skokie Review, December 14, 1961, p. 5).

Among community organizations formed is the Lyric Guild, Skokie Valley Chapter. (News (Skokie), December 30, 1971, p. 12 / Sunday Star, July 9, 1961, p. 1) and a second Skokie Art Guild is formed (News (Skokie), July 18, 1963, p. 3).

The Crawford Avenue Baptist church begins holding services in Highland School. (News (Skokie), May 27, 1965, p. 20).

1962    The Crawford Avenue Baptist Church is formally established with Reverend C. Orville Kool as pastor. (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, p. 72).

April    The Skokie Public Library building wins the "Chicagoland's Best" architectural award. (News (Skokie), January 3, 1963, p. 1 / News (Skokie), April 11, 1963, p. 1).

April     The official Skokie motto, "Village of Vision", is adopted. (News (Skokie), April 19, 1962, p. 2 / Sunday Star, April 15, 1962, p. 1).

May     The Chicago Specialty Manufacturing Company moves to 7500 Linder. (News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 38).

June     Rev. Gilbert Weisshaar becomes Senior Minister at Central Methodist Church. ( Ardis Coninx, Central United Methodist Church, op.cit., 6).

June 26    The Skokie Village Board adopts a proclamation citing Skokie as the "World's Largest Village" -- its population passes Oak Park by 4,200. (News (Skokie), June 28, 1962, p. 1).

July 28     The formal festival celebrating Skokie's 75th anniversary, the Skokie Diamond Jubilee Celebration, opens the Village's yearlong celebration. (Chicago Sun-Times, July 11, 1962, p. 44 / News (Skokie), May 3, 1962, p. 1 / News (Skokie), July 26, 1962, p. 1) / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 1 / Sunday Star, July 29, 1962, p. 1 / The Life (Skokie), January 17, 1963 Section 3).

Among community organizations formed are:

         Skokie Historical Society (Life (Skokie), sec. 3, January 17, 1963, pp. 9-10 / News (Skokie), January 3, 1963, p. 31 / Sunday Star, February 10, 1963, p. 1)

         Skokie Valley Symphony Orchestra. (News (Skokie), January 3, 1963, p. 1)

         Skokie Valley Welfare Council, (News (Skokie), January 3, 1963, p. 1)

         Visiting Nurses Association of the Skokie Valley (News (Skokie), January 3, 1963, p. 1 / News (Skokie), October 10, 1963, p. 3)

The Skokie Park District constructs the Laramie Park Recreational Center. (History of the Skokie Park District, p. 11, Archives, Skokie Park District).

1963  (January 16)    Harold Atchison, President of Thermal Equipment Company, a subsidiary of Farley Mfg. Co., Skokie, is installed as President of the Skokie Chamber of Commerce. (Skokie News, January 3, 1963, p. 3).

January 21     The Chicago North Shore and Milwaukee Railroad closes down because of financial losses -"a victim of automobiles and the expressways." (Life (Skokie), January 24, 1963, p. 1 / News (Skokie), December 20, 1962, p. 1 / News (Skokie), January 24, 1963, p. 1).

April 1     Kassner's "California Men's Shop" opens at 4860 Oakton Street. (Sunday Star, April 7, 1963 / Archives, Skokie Chamber of Commerce).

Spring     The Northern Illinois Gas Company holder, which had stood at McCormick and Oakton since 1911, is dismantled. (News (Skokie), November 15, 1962, p. 16).

March 23     Loyola University of Chicago, led by Coach George Ireland of Skokie, defeats the University of Cincinnati Bearcats 60-58 in overtime at Louisville's Freedom Hall for the NCAA Mens Basketball title. This team was the first nationally prominent collegiate basketball team to start four African-Americans. (Archives, Chicago Tribune, August 10, 1997, Bill Jauss).

March 23     President John F. Kennedy formally dedicates Chicago-O'Hare International Airport. It is named for naval war hero Lt. Commander Edward H. "Butch" O'Hare. The airport had been open to commercial air traffic since 1955 and was to become the major commercial airport of the Chicago area, bringing commercial opportunities to the northern suburbs including Skokie. (Illinois: Descriptive and Historical Guide, 1974, p. 53 / Illinois Guide and Gazetteer, op.cit., pp. 124-125 / D. Ray Wilson, Greater Chicago Historical Tour Guide, 1st Ed., 1989, Crossroads Communications, Carpentersville, IL., 1989, p. 228).

April     As provided under Illinois law, all ten public school districts of Niles Township enter into a joint agreement and establish a Department of Special Education. (News (Skokie), April 4, 1963, p. 14).

April     The Niles Township Real Estate Board changes its name to the North Suburban Real Estate Board. (News (Skokie), April 4, 1963, p. 61 / News (Skokie), July 3, 1963, p. 35).

April 8     The Skokie Public Library building is honored by the American Institute of Architects and the American Library Association. (News (Skokie), April 11, 1963, p. 3).

May 2     Charlotte, Grand Duchess of Luxembourg, on a state visit to the United States, is hosted at a reception at the Luxembourg Gardens in Morton Grove. (Witry, op.cit., p. 153).

June 3     Pope John XXIII dies in Rome. (Buisseret et.al., op.cit. p. 98).

June    The Skokie Chamber of Commerce opposes the construction of an incinerator to be located at 3500 Jarvis, Skokie. (Skokie Life, June 27, 1963 / Archives, Skokie Chamber of Commerce).

July 20     Skokie's Diamond Jubilee Celebration draws to a close with a giant parade from Old Orchard Shopping Center past a reviewing stand near Oakton and Niles Center Road. (News (Skokie), July 18, 1963, p. 1).

September     1,270 children are enrolled at St. Peter Catholic School. (Buisseret et.al., op.cit. p. 98).

September     The railroad crossing at Searle Parkway is opened to vehicular traffic. (Skokie Review, September 12, 1963 / Archives, Skokie Chamber of Commerce).

September 14    Skokie resident Joseph J. Witry is appointed by the Luxembourg government as its Consul General in Chicago, IL. and 5 neighboring states. (Buisseret et.al., op.cit., p. 98 / Witry, op.cit., p. 152).

November 3    The Skokie Valley Community Hospital is dedicated. (Life (Skokie), October 31, 1963, sec. 4, p. 3 / News (Skokie), October 3, 1963, p. 3 / News (Skokie), October 31, 1963, p. 1 / News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 40 b).

November 22     President John F. Kennedy is assassinated in Dallas, TX by Lee Harvey Oswald. (Chicago Tribune, November 23, 1963, p. 1).

November 25     An official day of mourning for assassinated President John F. Kennedy. All Village flags are flown at half-mast for a period of thirty days. (Life (Skokie), November 29, 1963, p. 1 / News (Skokie), November 27, 1963, p. 1).

December 29    The Chicago Bears defeat the New York Giants 14-10 in Wrigley Field for the NFL title. (Chicago Tribune, December 30, 1963).

1964  (April)     Skokie Swift Rapid Transit Service is inaugurated at the Dempster Terminal area. (Chicago Transit Authority. Research and Planning Dept., 1968, p. 34 / News (Skokie), April 16, 1964, p. 1 / News (Skokie), sec. 2, September 9, 1965, p. 12).

June 7     The largest 8th grade class ever, 161 members, graduates from St. Peter Catholic School. (Buisseret et.al., op.cit., p. 99).

August    A comprehensive amendment to Skokie's zoning ordinance is presented to the Village Board. (Life (Skokie), August 6, 1964, p. 1 / News (Skokie), August 6, 1964, p. 1).

November 1     Niles Township High School North, located immediately west of Old Orchard Shopping Center, is dedicated. (News (Skokie), October 29, 1964, p. 1).

Skokie has approximately 900 retail establishments with annual retail sales exceeding $175,000,000 and 350 industries whose gross product approaches $1,000,000,000. (Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 23).

Skokie has 21 public, 4 parochial primary schools, Orchard School for Exceptional Children and 3 high schools. There is a ninety-three man police department and an eighty-three man fire department. (Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., p. 23).

Skokie voters pass a $2,000,000.00 bond issue which allows the Skokie Park District, in conjunction with the receipt of a $6,000,000.00 grant from the U.S. Dept. of HUD, to purchase and develop the following sites: Carol Park - .4 acres / Coyle n/k/a Norman Schack Park - 4.2 acres / Emerson Park - 5 acres / Henry Gleiss Park - 4 acres / Kostner n/k/a Donald Lyon Park - 4 acres / Walter Lauth Park - 2.9 acres / Main - Hamlin Tennis Park - .5 acres / Skokie Park Tennis Center - 5 acres. (History of the Skokie Park District, p. 11, Archives, Skokie Park District).35

A survey conducted by the Church Federation of Greater Chicago describes Skokie religious composition to be 1 Protestant family to 2 Catholic families to 3 Jewish families. (Omnibus, Emerson, op.cit., October, 1964, p. 23).

1965   (April)     Albert J. Smith is elected to the first of his 6 terms as the 14th Village President. (Whittingham, op. cit., p. 122).

May 26     At 9:10 a.m., a tornado touches down at Old Orchard Junior High School and rips off almost 80% of the roof. (Life (Skokie), May 27, 1965, p. 1 / News (Skokie), May 27, 1965, p. 1).

August 2     The Village Board issues a directive to the Board of Local Improvements to pave the last twelve miles of unpaved streets in Skokie. (News (Skokie), July 29, 1965, p. 1 / Sunday Star, August 1, 1965, p. 1).

November     The Skokie Community Goals Commission holds its first meeting. (Sunday Star, November 28, 1965, p. 1).

U. S. Welders Supply Company moves to 9110 Terminal Avenue in Skokie. (News (Skokie), September 9, 1965, p. 18).

Skokie wins the 1965 "Award of Merit for Leadership" given by American City magazine for its development of the Skokie Swift. (Sunday Star, January 2, 1966, p. 1).

1966  (January 23)    The Leaning Tower YMCA serving Skokie, Edgebrook, Golf, Lincolnwood, Morton Grove, Niles and Sauganash is dedicated. (Life (Skokie), January 20, 1966, p. 1 / News (Skokie), January 20, 1966, p. 1).

August 6     The Skokie Indians defeat LaGrange for the state baseball championship. (News (Skokie), August 11, 1966, p. 32).

August 8     Skokie Village Board votes to purchase "Duffy's Tavern" located at 8024 Lincoln Avenue for purposes of a public parking lot. (News (Skokie), August 11, 1966, p. 6)

November 24     Former Niles Township Democratic Committeeman Martin "Scotty" Krier dies at the age of 76. (News (Skokie), December 1, 1966, p. 1).

Skokie ranks second in the nation in terms of most telephones per hundred persons. There are also 60,000 cars registered. (Chicago's American, January 19, 1967, p. 48 / News (Skokie), January 20, 1966, p. 6).

Congregation Kol Emeth is established with Rabbi Nathan Levinson as its spiritual leader. (News (Skokie), March 13, 1975, p. 3).

Skokie schools include 12 public primary schools, 3 public junior highs, 3 public high schools, 3 Catholic grammar schools, 2 Jewish grammar schools, 1 Lutheran grammar school and the Hebrew Theological College. (Chicago's American, January 19, 1967, p. 48).

Community organizations form the Inter-Village Mental Health Association (Life (Skokie), May 5, 1966, p. 1), Skokie Choral Society (News (Skokie), January 16, 1975. P. 34), Skokie Fine Arts Commission (News (Skokie), March 24, 1966, p. 11), Women's Group of the Niles Township Regular Democratic Org. (Life (Skokie), February 24, 1966, p. 1).

1967   (January 10)     The Niles Township Federation of Teachers (AFL-CIO) wins a resounding victory over the NTEA and is established as the bargaining agent for Niles Township High School teachers. (News (Skokie), January 12, 1967, p. 1 / Skokie Life, December 28, 1967, p. 1 / Skokie Review, January 12, 1967, p. 3).

January 26    26 inches of snow, one of the worst blizzards ever, strikes Skokie. (Chicago Tribune, February 19, 1967, sec. 7s, unp. / News (Skokie), February 2, 1967, p. 1 / Skokie Life, December 28, 1967, p. 1).

March     Raymond C. "Tom" Klehm, son of George C. Klehm and Elizabeth Ruesch Klehm, Niles Township School Treasurer for 36 years, dies. (Coninx, op. cit., p. 15).

March 21     An ordinance providing for the purchase of a fire station at 7424 Niles Center Road is published. (News (Skokie), March 21, 1968, p. 29).

May 25     The Niles Township Federation of Teachers strike over a salary dispute, the first teacher strike in community history. (News (Skokie), May 25, 1967, p. 1 / News (Skokie), December 28, 1967, p. 1 / Skokie Life, December 28, 1967, p. 1 / Skokie Review, June 1, 1967, p. 1 / Sunday Life, May 28, 1967, p. 1).

June 2     Skokie resident and longtime funeral director Raymond W. Haben dies. (Skokie News, June 8, p. 1).

June 5     Skokie resident Joseph J. Witry, Attorney, Bank Director, former 219 School Board Member, Judicial candidate and Consul General of Luxembourg, dies at the age of 61. (Skokie News, June 8, p. 1).

June 10 & 11     A devastating thunderstorm hits Skokie. (News (Skokie), June 15, 1967, p. 1 / U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, op.cit., pp. 32-33).

Summer     Dr. Ralph Johnson succeeds George Savage as Superintendent of Education of District 69. (Coninx, op. cit., p. 15).

August     The Skokie Village Board authorizes formation of the Flood Control Action Commission. (Skokie Life, August 3, 1967, p. 1).

October     Skokie's first anti-discrimination housing ordinance is passed. (News (Skokie), October 12, 1967, p. 1 / Skokie Life, October 12, 1967, p. 1 / Sunday Life, October 8, 1967, p. 1).

October 27     Special election is held to increase District 69's tax rate. The proposal passes 635 to 486. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 16)

November 6     The multimillion-dollar Miller commercial development on the southeast corner of Skokie Boulevard and Golf Road, the site of the Skokie Fun Fair, is approved. (News (Skokie), November 9, 1967, p. 1 / Skokie Life, November 9, 1967, p. 1).

Skokie has 329 industrial plants within its boundaries and 900 commercial businesses, including Old Orchard Shopping Center. (Chicago's American, January 19, 1967, p. 48).

Sometime between February, 1967 and August 3, 1967, "Duffy's Tavern" at 8024 Lincoln Avenue is demolished in favor of a public parking lot. (Skokie Life, February 23, 1967, p. 1 / Jean Doney Scrapbooks, 1967-69, Microfilm, SPL, Frame 676 / Jean Doney Scrapbooks, 1967-69, Microfilm, SPL, Frame 690).

1968   (July 25)    An ordinance creating the Skokie Mass Transit District is published. (News (Skokie), July 25, 1968, p. 29).

September     District 69 enrollment is 2,262 pupils. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 22).

November 21     The Jewish Community Center of Niles Township receives permission to erect a facility on Church between LeClaire and Lawler, extending north to Lyons. (News (Skokie), November 27, 1968, p. 1 / Sunday Life, November 24, 1968, p. 1).

December 2     A new Skokie Fair Housing Ordinance is passed prohibiting discrimination in housing by owners and realtors. The amended ordinance prohibits discrimination in the sale, rental, lease or financing of housing accommodations because of race, religion, color, national origin or ancestry by owners and other persons. (News (Skokie), October 12, 1967, p. 1 / News (Skokie), December 5, 1968, p. 1 / Skokie Life, December 5, 1968, sec. 1, p. 1).

1969    Only six percent of the land in Skokie is vacant - available in scattered lots. (Skokie Life, sec. 2, July 3, 1969, p. 1).

February 2     Skokie's new Fine Arts Center, 10054 Skokie Boulevard, holds its first public open house. (News (Skokie), January 30, 1969, p. 1).

April     Niles and Maine Township residents vote in favor of establishing a two-year junior college. District 535 is born. (Skokie Review, April 10, 1969, p. 3).

April 27     The stained glass windows on the north and south side of the sanctuary of Central Methodist Church are dedicated. Ardis Coninx, Central United Methodist Church, op.cit., 7).

May 13     The Cook County Policemen's Association demands that the Village Board recognize the union as the bargaining agent for unranked Skokie Policemen. The Board refuses. (News (Skokie), May 15, 1969, p. 7).

July 16     Apollo 11 Moon Mission is launched from Cape Kennedy. Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Mike Collins leave for the Moon. (Chicago Tribune, July 18, 1999, Section 18, p. 6).

July 20     The Apollo 11 "LEM", the "Eagle", lands on the moon. Neil Armstrong, by making one giant leap for mankind, becomes the first human being to walk on the lunar surface. (Chicago Tribune, July 18, 1999, Section 18, p. 6).

October     Referendum to build a new junior high in District 69 loses. (Coninx, op. cit., p. 17).

December     Special election is held to increase District 69's tax rates. All fail. (Coninx, op.cit, p. 17).

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1970 to 1979

1970   (February 9)    The Planning Commission presents the Village Board with a comprehensive plan to regulate development in downtown Skokie. (The Comprehensive Plan, Skokie, IL., Harland Bartholomew and Associates, 1969, p. 87 / News (Skokie), February 12, 1970, p. 1 / News (Skokie), December 31, 1970, p. 2).

February 15     John N. Matzer, Jr. of New Jersey, succeeds Gordon Thorn as Skokie's Village Manager. His salary is established at $23,000.00. Gordon Thorn left for a similar position in Chula Vista, CA. (Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

February 21     Special election to increase District 69's educational fund passes 1,647 to 1,625. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 17).

March 20     Skokie postmen, Branch 3071 of the AFL-CIO National Letter Carriers, vote to strike, joining Chicago and other suburbs, over a wage dispute. (News (Skokie), March 26, 1970, p. 1 / Skokie Life, sec. 2, March 26, 1970, p. 1).

May 4    The President and staff of Oakton Community College move into their interim quarters at 7900 Nagle, Morton Grove, and open for business. (News (Skokie), April 30, 1970, p. 1 / News (Skokie), September 17, 1970, p. 1).

May 27     Skokien Joseph J. Witry is posthumously inducted into the Loyola University Sports Hall of Fame along with fellow Skokien George Ireland. (Archives, Loyola University).

July 20     Skokie Public Works Department employees conduct a one-day strike in a wage dispute. (News (Skokie), July 23, 1970, p. 1 / Skokie Life, July 23, 1970, p. 1).

July 24    Two tactical squads of the Cook County Sheriff's police patrol the village streets as an epidemic of "blue flu" hits the police department during a wage dispute. (News (Skokie), July 30, 1970, p. 1 / Skokie Life, July 30, 1970, p. 1).

September 14     Oakton Community College opens for business at Nagel and Oakton Streets in Morton Grove, IL. (OCC / Fall Credit Class Schedule, V. 7, No. 4, July, 1999).

October 22     Dominick's opens its 23rd store at 4020 Oakton Street. (Archives, Skokie Chamber of Commerce).

November 5    The plans for revitalization of the Central Business District, Oakton-Lincoln area, are revealed. (News (Skokie), November 12, 1970, p. 1 / Skokie Life, October 22, 1970, p. 1 / Skokie Review, November 12, 1970, p. 3 / Sunday Life, November 8, 1970, p. 1).

November    District 69 Board members discuss the impact of the proposed redevelopment of downtown Skokie. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 17).

November    Illinois Voters adopt a new state Constitution. (Whitney, op.cit., p. 16).

Population of Skokie is 68,322. It includes:

         4,902 Poles

         2,780 Germans

         1,212 Italians

         9,110 Russians

(County and City Data Book, U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, G.P.O, 1977 (ed.), p. 832 / Illinois: A Descriptive and Historical Guide, op.cit., p. 461).

1971  (January)     The Skokie Village Board adopts an ordinance demanding freedom for Soviet Jews. (News (Skokie), December 30, 1971, p. 1).

February     "A Redevelopment Proposal for Downtown Skokie, Illinois" is prepared and presented by the Skokie Planning Commission, Don Perille, Chairman. (Archives, Skokie Historical Socity).

May 3     Skokie Village Board approves the redevelopment concept for downtown Skokie. (Village of Skokie, Council Agenda, May 3, 1971, Archives, Skokie Historical Society)

May     The First National Bank of Skokie announces plans for a new facility at Lincoln and Oakton. (Sunday Life, May 2, 1971, p. 1).

May 3     Project "Impact", the plan for revitalizing the Central Business District in Skokie, is adopted by the Village Board. (News (Skokie), May 6, 1971, p. 1 / News (Skokie), September 9, 1971, p. 1 / Skokie Life, May 6, 1971, p. 1).

May 16     The Julia S. Molloy Education Center is dedicated at 8701 Menard, Morton Grove. (News (Skokie), May 20, 1971, p. 11 / Skokie Review, May 6, 1971, p. 5).

June 25     Armond D. King apartments for senior citizens, 9238 Gross Point Road, is dedicated. (News (Skokie), June 29, 1972, p. 33).

July     The Near North Family Guidance Center, a treatment facility for drug abusers, opens at 5248 Washington. (News (Skokie), July 29, 1971, p. 1 / News (Skokie), September 23, 1971, p. 11 / Skokie Life, July 1, 1971, p. 1).

August 9    Skokie becomes the eighth North Shore community to join the North Suburban Mass Transit District (NORTRAN). (News (Skokie), August 12, 1971, p. 1 / Skokie Life, August 12, 1971, p. 1).

August 12     Ground breaking ceremonies are held for the 580 room Skokie Hilton Hotel at the SE corner of Golf Road and Skokie Boulevard. (News (Skokie), August 19, 1971, p. 6 / Skokie Life, August 22, 1971, p. 1).

August 16     The Skokie Consumer Fraud Office opens. (News (Skokie), August 12, 1971, p. 6).

September 12     The Mayer Kaplan Jewish Community Center holds an open house at 5050 Church to mark the beginning of its first season. (News (Skokie), September 9, 1971, p. 4 / News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 23).

September 26     Coyle Park, Laramie and Coyle avenues, is dedicated by the Skokie Park District. (News (Skokie), September 23, 1971, p. 1). Coyle Park is later renamed in honor of Commissioner Norman Schack. (Archives, Skokie Park District).

October 24     An open house is held at the Orchard Center, 8600 Gross Point Road, a Niles Township facility dealing with mental health. (News (Skokie), October 7, 1971, p. 2).

November 29     Mayor Albert Smith donates the first pint of blood under Skokie's blood donor program. The program ensured Skokians blood at no cost anywhere in the United States. (News (Skokie), December 2, 1971, p. 1).

Skokie voters defeat a Skokie Park District referendum to issue bonds to build an ice rink and golf course at the site of the old Skokie dump at Gross Point Rd. and Church Street. The Board of Park Commissioners issue $1,060,000.00 in non-referendum revenue bonds to finance the construction of the ice rink and golf course. (History of the Skokie Park District, Archives, Skokie Park District, p. 11).

The Chicago Stock Yards close. (Whitney, op.cit., p. 16).

Intel Corporation introduces the first microprocessor. (Encyclopedia Britannica, Multimedia Edition, 1999).

1972  (January 23 - 24)    Coach N Fore Restaurant, at 7952 Lincoln Avenue (SW corner of Lincoln & Oakton, burns down. (Skokie Fire Dept. Photographs, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

April    The Board of Commissioners of the Skokie Park Board approve plans to build a par three nine-hole golf course and ice rink on the site of the former Village dump at Church Street and Gross Point Rd. (News (Skokie), April 27, 1972, p. 10).

May 31     Julia Malloy retires from District 69. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 19).

June 2     The Niles West Indians, coached by Jim Phipps, win their first Illinois high school baseball championship. (Skokie Life, June 8, 1972, p. 1).

June 11     A memorial to Dr. Janusz Korczak, one of the heroes of the Warsaw ghetto, is unveiled at the southwest corner of Dr. Korczak Terrace and Church Street. (News (Skokie), June 15, 1972, p. 2 / Sunday Life, April 26, 1970, p. 1).

July 10     The Skokie Public Library opens its new addition, doubling its floor space. It is second in size only to the Chicago Public Library among public libraries in the state. (News (Skokie), February 4, 1971, p. 10 / News (Skokie), August 3, 1972, p. 12 / Skokie Life, July 6, 1972, p. 1 / Skokie Review, July 20, 1972, p. 5).

September     Girl's Interscholastic sports are introduced into the Lincoln School curriculum. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 19).

September 19    The Village of Skokie passes a disannexation ordinance disconnecting a portion of the "hockey stick" of land located along Ionia Avenue from Lunt to Central Avenue. This disannexation completes the 1954 disannexation of the 52 acres property upon which the Loyola University Medical Center was to be built. (The Geographical Growth of Skokie, Illinois. Joseph C. Beaver, Skokie, 1983.)36

October 8     The first Village Open House is held at the Fire Department-Public Works Garage to acquaint residents with the various services and functions of the Village. (News (Skokie), October 5, 1972, p. 1 / Skokie Life, October 12, 1972, sec. 1, p. 1, sec. 2, p. 3).

The North Shore Hilton is built on the SE corner of Golf Road and Skokie Blvd., the site of the former Fun-Fair Amusement Park. (Skokie Review, January 15, 1997, p. 3).

Maine-Niles Association of Special Recreation is formed by the Skokie Park District, Morton Grove Park District, Niles Park District, Des Plaines Park District, Park Ridge Park Board, Lincolnwood Recreation Board and Golf Maine Park District. Its purpose is to provide recreational opportunities to the mentally and physically handicapped. (History of the Skokie Park District, p. 11, Archives, Skokie Park District).

1973  (February 19)     The Village Board passes a controversial sign ordinance limiting the type of signs allowed in the village. (Skokie Review, March 1, 1973, p. 5).

May    The Jewish Community Center in Skokie celebrates the twenty-fifth anniversary of Israel with several events, including a parade through the Skokie streets. May 6 is proclaimed as Israel Independence Day in Skokie. (News (Skokie), May 3, 1973, p. 17 / Skokie Review, May 3, 1973, p. 5).

June 9     The eyes of Skokie are glued to television as the great race horse Secretariat wins the Belmont, and the first triple crown since 1948, in a record 2:24. He won the race by an astounding 31 lengths. (Sports Illustrated, July 26, 1999, Pictures of the Century, p. 110).

June     Weber Park Golf Course and Skokie Skatium Ice Rink open. (News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 24 / Archives, Skokie Park District).

September     District 69 enrollment is 1,719 pupils. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 20).

September     The Niles Township Federation of Teachers votes to strike and delay the opening of school. (News (Skokie), September 6, 1973, p. 1 / Skokie Review, September 13, 1973, p. 3).

October 27     The North Shore Hilton in Skokie is formally dedicated at Golf Road and Skokie Boulevard. (News (Skokie), October 18, 1973, p. 3 / News (Skokie), December 27, 1973, p. 2).

October 27     The Skatium, Skokie Park District's artificial ice rink, opens. (News (Skokie), October 18, 1973, p. 13 / News (Skokie), December 27, 1973, p. 2 / News (Skokie), January 16, 1975, p. 24 / Skokie Review, November 1, 1973, p. 3).

December     The Skokie Office on Aging, 4436 Oakton, holds an open house. (Peggy W. Gilmour, ** Skokie Office on Aging: May 25, 1983).

The First National Bank begins construction of its new building, in furtherance of the plans for revitalizing the Downtown Business District. (News (Skokie), December 27, 1973, p. 2).

1974  (January 7)    Community Psychiatric Centers, Inc. received permission to build a one-hundred bed hospital (Orchard Hospital). (News (Skokie), December 20, 1973, p. 1 / News (Skokie), January 10, 1974, p. 1 / Skokie Life, December 20, 1973, p. 1 / Skokie Review, January 10, 1974, p. 5).

February 23     Alma Klehm, teacher and daughter of Skokie pioneers, dies at the age of 98. ((News (Skokie), February 28, 1974, p. 1 / Skokie Life, February 28, 1974, p. 1).

April 29    Bart Connor, a sophomore at Niles West High School, appears in Sport Illustrated's "Faces in the Crowd" feature for winning the IHSA all-around gymnastics title with an 8.59 average. He won the parallel bars for the second successive year. (Sports Illustrated, The Chicago Collection, February 11, 1998, p. 8).

October 21    The Women's Outreach Resource Center, a MONACEP program, opens for one week in the Skokie Public Library. The program, an information and referral source for area women, rotates among six centers in Niles and Maine Townships. (News (Skokie), October 17, 1974, p. 8 / Skokie Review, November 7, 1974, p. 3).

November 14     The Northeastern Illinois Planning Commission endorses the North Shore Channel Deep Rock Tunnel, from Addison Street to Wilmette. The Metropolitan Sanitary District project is designed to alleviate basement flooding in the Skokie area. (News (Skokie), November 14, 1974, p. 3 / Skokie Review, September 25, 1975, p. 3).

The Skokie Industrial Directory lists 337 industries in Skokie, fifty of which employ over fifty people. (Skokie Industrial Directory, Skokie Chamber of Commerce, 1974, 17 pp).

A lighted ball field is installed at Laramie Park. (History of the Skokie Park District, p. 12, Archives, Skokie Park District).

1975  (February)     A new home for the Skokie Fine Arts Center is opened at 7908 Babb. (Skokie Life, February 6, 1975, p. 1 / Skokie Review, December 31, 1974, p. 5 / Skokie Review, April 10, 1975, pp. 1, 8).

April 2     A blizzard hits Skokie and results in many traffic accidents, abandoned cars and three deaths in the area. (News (Skokie), April 10, 1975, p. 22 / Sunday Life, April 6, 1975, p. 1).

May 12    School District 68 Board of Education accepts the recommendation that Sharp Corner School be closed due to declining enrollment. (News (Skokie), May 15, 1975, p. 3).

June    The Indians of Niles West High School, coached by Jim Phipps, win the State Tournament Baseball crown. (Skokie Review, June 12, 1975, pp. 3, 43, 46).

June 16     High School District 219 Board of Education votes 4-2 to close Niles East High School due to declining enrollment. (News (Skokie), June 19, 1975, p. 3 / Skokie Life, June 19, 1975, p. 1 / Sunday Life, June 15, 1975, p. 1).

June     Rev. Joseph Buckles is appointed Senior Minister at Central United Methodist Church. Ardis Coninx, Central United Methodist Church, op.cit., 9).

July 4     The Village of Skokie begins the United States Bicentennial Celebration with a day long festival on the Nilehi West Campus. (News (Skokie), July 3, 1975, p. 13).

July 4 - 13     Police union members of the Combined Counties Police Association begin a "uniform strike" appearing for work without uniforms to emphasize pay raise demands. (News (Skokie), July 10, 1975, p. 3 News (Skokie), January 1, 1976, p. 3 / Skokie Life, July 3, 1975, p. 1 Skokie Review, July 10, 1975, p. 3 / Sunday Life, July 13, 1975, p. 1).

August 8     The Skokie Park District Tennis Center at 8350 Niles Center Road opens. (News (Skokie), August 7, 1975, p. 25 / Skokie Life, August 7, 1975, p. 1).

September     District 69 enrollment is 1,481 pupils. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 21).

September     St. Peter Catholic School enrollment is 416 pupils. (Buisseret et.al., op. cit., p. 105).

October 18     At a special election, District 69 voters defeat a request to increase the education tax rate. The tally is 587 yes and 1,417 no. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 21).

October 26    Oakton Community College holds ground breaking ceremonies at its permanent campus site in Des Plaines. (Skokie Review, October 23, 1975, p. 3).

December     Skokie Federal Savings and Loan Association opens Illinois' first supermarket bank on the premises of the Skokie Jewel-Turnstyle, 9449 Skokie Boulevard. (News (Skokie), December 4, 1975, p. 16).

1976  (February)     College Hill School, scheduled for closing because of declining enrollment, is to be re-opened as an instructional services center for District 65 teachers. (Sunday Life, February 1, 1976, p. 1).

February 9     Niles Township High School Board 219 establishes the Committee to Close Niles East. (School District 219, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

March 12     One person is killed and several injured when a tornado touches down in Niles Township. (Sunday Life, March 14, 1976, p. 1).

March 13     At a special election, District 69 voters defeat a request to increase the education tax rate. The tally is 798 yes and 1,676 no. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 21).

April 19     Village ordinance #76 4-2-908 is passed, rezoning the property at the northwest corner of Lincoln and Galitz to allow 150 low-rent housing units for the elderly to be constructed. (News (Skokie), April 22, 1976, p. 3 / News (Skokie), April 29, 1976, p. 27 / Skokie Review, April 1, 1976, p. 3).37

June     School District 68 closes Sharp Corner School because of declining enrollment. (News (Skokie), May 15, 1975, p. 3 / News (Skokie), June 10, 1976, p. 4).

June 21     The ad-hoc committee appointed by Niles Township High School District 219 presents its report recommending that Niles East High School be closed at the conclusion of the 1979-80 school year. (The Sunday Life, June 20, 1976, p. 1).

June     The organizational meeting of the governing board for the Sharp Corner School of the Arts was held in the Sharp Corner School. (News (Skokie), June 10, 1976, p. 4).

June     District 69 Board of Education appoints James Metzinger to be principal of Lincoln, Walter Stahlke to be principal of Edison, Galen Jarvis to be principal of Madison and Marjorie Wedell to be principal of Kenton. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 21).

June 28    The Meals-on-Wheels pilot project of the Skokie Office on Aging to bring meals to invalid seniors, is funded by Niles Township. (News (Skokie), July 1, 1976, p. 4).

July 4     The United States of America celebrates its 200th Birthday.

August 9     College Hill School, closed because of declining enrollment, is leased for two years to Brisk Rabbinical College by action of the District 65 School Board. (Skokie Life, August 12, 1976, p. 1 / News (Skokie), August 12, 1976, p. 3 / Sunday Life, December 12, 1976, p. 1).

September    District 69 enrollment is 1,367 pupils. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 22).

September     St. Peter Catholic School enrollment is 390 pupils. (Buisseret et.al.,op.cit., p. 105).

September 17     The United States Court of Appeals orders the Village of Skokie to reinstate 32 policemen fired in the wake of a uniform strike in July 1975. (News (Skokie), September 23, 1976, p. 3 / Skokie Life, September 23, 1976, sec. 1, p. 1, sec. 2-A, p. 1).

September 20     The Niles Township Federation of Teachers strike during contract negotiations. (News (Skokie), September 23, 1976, p. 3 Skokie Life, September 30, 1976, p. 1 / Skokie Review, September 23, 1976, p. 3 / Sunday Life, September 26, 1976, p. 1).

October 4     Frank Collin, leader of a band of Nazi sympathizers from Chicago's South side, sends a letter to Daniel D. Brown, Director of Parks and Recreation, Skokie Park District, requesting that his group be permitted to march in Skokie's "Birch Park" on November 6, 1976. (Letter from Frank Collin to Skokie Park District dtd October 4, 1976, Archives, Skokie Park District / Minutes of the Board Meeting of October 25, 1976, Skokie Park District Board of Park Commissioners, Archives, Skokie Park District).

October 25     At its regular meeting, the Board of Commissioners of the Skokie Park District direct Daniel D. Brown, Director of Parks and Recreation, to respond to Mr. Collin of the Nationalist Socialist Party that Skokie has no "Birch Park". In addition, the Board passes an ordinance relating to "Parades and Public Assemblies" which required that prospective marchers to 1) obtain a permit at least thirty days in advance of the parade date and 2) post an insurance bond equal to $350,000.00. (Minutes of the Board Meeting of October 25, 1976, Skokie Park District Board of Park Commissioners (Ordinance attached), Archives, Skokie Park District)

November 7     A memorial to Skokie's celebration of the United States Bicentennial is dedicated -- a park along the canal banks north of Church Street. (News (Skokie), November 11, 1976, p. 5).

December 12     The newly formed Skokie Independent party holds its first general meeting to discuss running a full slate of candidates against the Caucus Party. (Skokie Life, December 16, 1976, p. 1).

December 20     Richard J. Daley, Mayor of the City of Chicago since 1955, dies. (Chicago Tribune, December 21, 1976, p. 1).

December 31     Skokie Federal Savings and Loan reaches $167 million in assets. (Skokie Review, January 27, 1977).

1977  (January 17)     Bernard Nathan and former Skokie News Publisher, Roland Moore, announce the formation of a ticket to run against the Skokie Caucus Party in the April elections. The Skokie Independent Party will run Bernard Nathan for Mayor, Roland Moore for Village Clerk and the following for Trustee: Robert Morris, James Gootreich, Mary Ann Powers, James Daleiden, Robert Nordin and Barbara Horwitz. (Skokie Review, January 20, 1977, p. 3).

January     The Independent Township Caucus Party is formed. The candidates are: Charles Anderson for Supervisor, Edmund Kaufman for Clerk, Arnold Abrams for Assessor, Eleanor Ficht for Collector, Don Copeland, Carl Gubitz, Erna Gans and Edward "Spike" McGrath for Trustees. This slate will be opposed by the Service Township Party. The candidates are: Ed Warman for Supervisor, Lou Black for Clerk, Robert Hanrahan for Assessor, Michael Linn for Collector, Tony Gagliano, Marge Sherman, Tim Doron and Tom McElligott for Trustees. (Skokie Review, January 27, 1977).

February 8     Muriel Ruth Jacobson, a member of the Skokie Caucus Party, loses her bid to join the slated Caucus party candidates. Albert Smith will run for Mayor, William Siegel for Clerk and the following for Trustee: Jackie Gorell, William Elliott, Manley Croft, Charles J. Conrad, Frank McCabe and Morris Topol. (Skokie Review, February 10, 1977, p. 3).

February 20     Phyllis Gentry Koehnline is ordained a minister of United Presbyterian Church at Evanshire Church. (Skokie Review, February 17, 1977, p. 38).

February 23     Former Skokie Trustee, Walter Flintrup, is elected Chairman of the North Suburban Transit Agency (NORTRAN) (Skokie Review, March 3, 1977).

March 21     The Illinois Supreme Court rules that 7 of 8 nominees of the Independent Township Caucus Party should be reinstated on the ballot. (Skokie Review, March 24, 1977, p.3).

April     Rev. Harry Conner is appointed Senior Minister at Central United Methodist Church. (Ardis Coninx, Central United Methodist Church, op.cit., 10).

April 28     Judge Joseph Wosik, a judge in the Chancery Department of the Circuit Court of Cook County, in a suit filed by the Village of Skokie against the Nationalist Socialist party, issues a preliminary injunction prohibiting members of the Nationalist Socialist party from marching in Skokie. In this suit, the Village asserts, as a matter of fact, that the Jewish population is approximately 40,000 out of a total population of 70,000. (Defending my enemy: American Nazis, the Skokie Case and the Risks of Freedom. Aryeh Neier, E.P. Dutton, N.Y., N.Y., 1979, p. 44).38

May 2     The Skokie Village Board, in response to a request from Nationalist Socialist party for a permit to march in front of Skokie Village Hall, passes three ordinances which 1) require a $350,000.00 indemnity bond to be posted in advance of any march (V.O. 77-5-N-994) 2) prohibits the distribution of printed material which promotes hatred of groups of people (V.O. 77-5-N-995) and 3) prohibits demonstrations by individuals wearing military style uniforms (V.O. 77-5-N-996). (Skokie Life, October 27, 1977, p. 1 / Opinion, U.S. Court of Appeals, 7th Cir., Collin v. Smith, et.al, Nos. 78-1381 & 78-1385, Issued May 22, 1978, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

June 22     Frank Collin and his band of Nazis apply to Skokie officials for a permit to march in Skokie. (Letter from Nationalist Socialist Party of America to John N. Matzer, Jr., Manager, Village of Skokie, dtd June 22, 1977, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

June 24     The Village of Skokie denies the Nazis the right to a permit to march in military style uniforms. (Letter from John N. Matzer, Jr., Manager, Village of Skokie to Frank Collin, National Socialist Party, dtd June 24, 1977, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

August 16     Elvis Presley dies at his Graceland mansion in Memphis, TN. (Chicago Tribune, August 17, 1977, p. 1).

October 21     Judge Bernard Decker of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois issues a preliminary injunction prohibiting the Village of Skokie from enforcing three ordinances aimed at preventing Frank Collin and his Nationalist Socialist party sympathizers from marching in Skokie. (Skokie Life, October 27, 1977, p. 1).

1978  (January 27)     The Illinois Supreme Court reverses the Illinois Appellate Court and the Circuit Court of Cook County's grant of Injunctive Relief in favor of the Village of Skokie and against the Nazi group headed by Frank Collin. The Nazis are free to March in Skokie pending resolution of the federal lawsuit filed by the ACLU on behalf of the Nazis. (Case No. 49769, Illinois Supreme Court).

February 23     Judge Bernard Decker of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois issues an order ruling that the three ordinances adopted by the Skokie Village Board aimed at preventing Frank Collin and his Nationalist Socialist party sympathizers from marching in Skokie are unconstitutional as violative of the 1st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. (Skokie Life, April 9, 1978, p. 1).

March 17     Judge Bernard Decker grants the Village of Skokie's Motion to stay his order voiding the Skokie anti-Nazi ordinances so as to permit the Village to perfect an appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit. (Application for Stay of Mandate, Harvey Schwartz & Gilbert Gordon, filed in the United States Supreme Court, No. 77-1736, on behalf of the Village of Skokie, p. 2 / Archives, Skokie Historical Society.)

April 6     The United States Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit, sitting en banc, vacates all previous "stay orders" and orders an expedited briefing schedule. (Application for Stay of Mandate, Harvey Schwartz & Gilbert Gordon, filed in the United States Supreme Court, No. 77-1736, on behalf of the Village of Skokie, p. 2 /Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

April 11    Frank Collin and his band of Nazis apply to the Village of Skokie for a permit to conduct a demonstration in front of Skokie's Village Hall on Sunday, June 25, 1978. (Application for Stay of Mandate, Harvey Schwartz & Gilbert Gordon, filed in the United States Supreme Court, No. 77-1736, on behalf of the Village of Skokie, p. 2 / Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

May 22     The United States Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit affirms Judge Decker's February 23, 1978 ruling that the three ordinances adopted by the Skokie Village Board aimed at preventing Frank Collin and his Nationalist Socialist party sympathizers from marching in Skokie are unconstitutional as violative of the 1st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. (Opinion, U.S. Court of Appeals, Nos. 78-1381 & 78-1385, Judges Pell, Sprecher (concurring in part and dissenting in part) and Wood, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

May 25    The Village of Skokie issues a permit allowing Frank Collin and his band of Nazi sympathizers to demonstrate in front of Skokie's Village Hall on Sunday, June 25, 1978. (Application for Stay of Mandate, Harvey Schwartz & Gilbert Gordon, filed in the United States Supreme Court, No. 77-1736, on behalf of the Village of Skokie, p. 2 / Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

June 2    The United States Court of Appeals, 7th Circuit, enters an order denying the Village of Skokie's request for a stay of mandate. Application for Stay of Mandate, Harvey Schwartz & Gilbert Gordon, filed in the United States Supreme Court, No. 77-1736, on behalf of the Village of Skokie, p. 3 / Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

June 5     The Village of Skokie files its Petition for Writ of Certiorari in the United States Supreme Court requesting review of the opinion of the United States Court of Appeals 7th Circuit, rendered in the Nazi case. (Application for Stay of Mandate, Harvey Schwartz & Gilbert Gordon, filed in the United States Supreme Court, No. 77-1736, on behalf of the Village of Skokie, p. 3).

June 22     Skokie Police Chief Kenneth Chamberlain issues a directive that the area bounded by Edens Highway, Howard Street, Skokie Blvd. and Main Street will be cordoned off to vehicular traffic on June 25. Only residents may enter into the cordoned off area. All vehicles will be subject to cursory searches for weapons. (Archives, Skokie Historical Society, 1983.36.4).

June 23    Frank Collin and his band of Nazi sympathizers cancel their planned demonstration in Skokie scheduled for June 25. (Statement by Mayor Albert J. Smith dtd June 23, 1978, Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

June 25     The date on which Frank Collin and his band of Nazi sympathizers are to march in front of Skokie's Village Hall. The march is called off when the City of Chicago relents and permits the group to march in Marquette Park on July 9. (Skokie Life, February 12, 1981, Sec. 1-B, p. 3 / Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

June     District 69 closes Kenton School. K-2 students are assigned to Madison School, 3-5 at Edison School and 6-8 at Lincoln School. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 22).

July 17     Oakton Community College officials and Niles Township High School District 219 officials meet secretly to discuss the possible sale of Niles High School District North to OCC. (News (Skokie), November 2, 1978, p. 2).

August     District 69 enters into a lease agreement for Kenton School with the Futabakai Japanese School. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 21).

October 19     OCC officials offer approximately $6,000,000.00 for the purchase of Niles North High School in order to turn it into its eastern campus. (Pickwick Papers, November 2, 1978, p. 6).

November 27     Niles Township High School District 219 Board of Education votes 5-1 to solicit offers for the sale or lease of both Niles North and Niles East. (The Life (Skokie), November 30, 1978, p. 3).

1979  (March 19)     Skokie Village Board entertains discussion about condemning the Skokie Theater for purposes of parking. (Skokie Review, March 22, 1979, p. 3).

September 4     District 219 teachers strike. (Skokie Review, September 27, 1979, p. 3).

September     Skokie Village Board turns down a PUD request to build condos on the Maierhoffer property. (Skokie Review, September 27, 1979, p. 3).

October 4     Pope John Paul II visits Chicago. (Chicago Tribune, October 5, 1979, p. 1).

Return to the Top of the Page

1980 to 1989

1980  (March 16)     Longtime District 69 teacher and principal Marjorie Wedell is killed in an automobile accident. (Skokie Review, March 20, 1980, p. 3) The Marjorie Wedell award is later instituted to recognize those who render outstanding service to the District. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 24).

June 1     Niles East High School closes its doors for the last time. (Skokie Review, June 5, 1980, p. 6).

November 14    Rabbi Karl Weiner, founding Rabbi of Temple Judea Mizpah, and President of the Board of Trustees of the Skokie Public Library, dies. (News (Skokie), November 20, 1980, p. 16).

Membership at Central United Methodist Church is approximately 600. (Ardis Coninx, Central United Methodist Church, op.cit., 11).

Skokie population is 60,278. (1980 Census / MDR Demographics Applications, Inc., Skokie Public Library, Long Range Planning Committee, 1999).

1981    Ardis Coninx is the first recipient of the Marjorie Wedell award. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 24).

November     School Board elections are held for the first time in November and not in April. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 24).

November 17     The made for TV film "Skokie", based upon the Village's fight to keep the Nazis from marching in Skokie in 1977 & 1978, airs on WBBM at 7:00 pm. Actor Ed Flanders portrays Mayor Smith and Eli Wallach portrays Harvey Schwartz. Danny Kaye portrays the fictional "Max Feldman", a Holocaust survivor. (Viewers Guide to "Skokie", Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

The Skokie Park District opens "Tot Learning Center", a day care center, at Laramie Park. (History of the Skokie Park District, p. 12, Archives, Skokie Park District).

Morton Grove bans the possession of handguns. (Whitney, op.cit., p. 17).

1982   (September)     The computer age dawns at Lincoln School with the installation of seven microcomputers. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 24).

December     The Futabakai Japanese School renews its lease of Kenton School for another 5 year period. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 25).

1983  (Winter)     Representatives from District 69 and 73 meet for the purpose of discussing consolidation. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 25).

February     Joseph J. Hansen, founder of Skokie Trust & Savings Bank, announces that he and the other majority shareholders have agreed to sell the bank to the Cole-Taylor Financial Group. (Skokie Review, February 10, 1983).

February 27     Norman Schack, proprietor of Wolke & Schack Dept. Store since 1952, Skokie Park Board President and member of the Chamber of Commerce, dies at the age of 72. (Skokie Review, March 3, 1983, p. 3).

June 6     Mayor Smith instructs the corporation counsel, Harvey Schwartz, to draft a hand-gun control ordinance for consideration at a meeting to be held September 19, 1983. (Skokie Review, June 9, 1983, p. 3).

June 6     William Miller assumes command of the Skokie Police Department succeeding Kenneth Chamberlain who retired. Skokie Trust & Savings Bank is robbed. (Skokie Review, June 9, 1983, p. 3).

September 19     The Skokie Village Board of Trustees, at a special meeting to consider the adoption of a hand-gun control ordinance, listens as approximately 1,000 people convene at the Centre East Auditorium and express their opinions. (Skokie Review, September 22, 1983, p.3).

October 3     The Skokie Village Board of Trustees, by a vote of 4-3, defeats a hand-gun control ordinance. Trustees Conrad, Gorell, McCabe and Elliott vote against the proposal. Trustees Fritzshall and Croft and Mayor Smith vote in favor. (Skokie Review, October 6, 1983, p. 3).

October 31     Chicago Bear founder George S. Halas dies at the age of 88. (Sports Illustrated, The Chicago Collection, February 11, 1998, p. 135).

1984  (August 14)     The Futabakai Japanese School ends its leasehold at Kenton School. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 25).

August     Bart Conner, a 1976 graduate of Niles West High School, wins the individual parallel bars gymnastics event at the 1984 Olympics held in Los Angeles. (Sports Illustrated, The Chicago Collection, February 11, 1998, p. 8).

October 7     Chicago Bear player Walter "Sweetness" Payton sets the NFL record for career rushing yards at Soldier Field against the New Orleans Saints eclipsing the record set by Cleveland Brown great Jim Brown. (Sports Illustrated, The Chicago Collection, February 11, 1998, p. 101).

1985  (July 31)    Rev. Arthur Sauer, Pastor Emeritus, St. Peter Catholic Church, dies. Fr. Sauer was a charter member of the Clergy Forum, a member of the Human Relations Commission and founder of the Niles Township Human Relations Council. (Buisseret et.al., op.cit., p. 12).

September 29     A retirement luncheon is held in honor of Mary Radmacher on the occasion of her retirement as Director of the Skokie Public Library. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 26).

1986  (January 26)    The Chicago Bears win Super Bowl XX in New Orleans, LA., defeating the AFC Champion New England Patriots 46-10. (Chicago Tribune, January 27, 1986, p. 1).

March 1     The shareholders of the First National Bank of Skokie sell to a group known as U.S. Ameribancs which continues to operate the bank as First National Bank of Skokie. (Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

September     Northwest Special Education Organization signs a one year lease for Kenton School. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 27).

1987  (January 13)     Oliver McCracken, Ph.d., resigns as Superintendent of School District 73 . (Skokie Life, March 26, 1987).

March 1     U.S. Ameribancs, owner of the First National Bank of Skokie, sells to National Bank of Detroit. The bank becomes known as NBD - Skokie. (Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

March 23     The District 73 School Board renames Oakview School "Oliver McCracken Middle School" in honor of retired Supt. Oliver McCracken, Ph.d. (Skokie Life, March 26, 1987).

June     Rev. Harry Conner retires as Senior Minister of Central United Methodist Church. He is succeeded by Rev. Robert Burkhart. (Ardis Coninx, Central United Methodist Church, op.cit., 16).

July 27    Rose Gordon is appointed Principal of Edison School by the District 69 Board of Education. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 28).

September     The Arie Crown Hebrew Day School leases Kenton School. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 28).

September 14     Mayor Albert J. Smith announces that he will retire, effective December 31st, after 22 years in office. (Skokie Review, September 17, 1987, p. 3 / Chicago Sun-Times, September 15, 1987, p. 22).

October 24     The Luxembourg Brotherhood of America celebrates its Centennial with a celebration at the North Shore Hilton. Crown Prince Henri and Crown Princess Maria Teresa of Luxembourg are in attendance. (Archives, Luxembourg Brotherhood of America).

1988  (January 4)     Trustee Jacqueline Gorell is sworn in as Skokie's 15th Mayor succeeding Albert J. Smith, who retired on December 31st. (Skokie Review, January 7, 1988, p. 3).

February 13     Skokie's Centennial celebration begins with a black tie dinner dance at the North Shore Hilton. (Archives, Village of Skokie).

June 30     Dr. Ralph Johnson retires as Superintendent of Education of District 69. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 28). Dr. Allan Maier is appointed to succeed Dr. Johnson as Superintendent of Education. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 29).

August 12 - 14     The Village of Skokie celebrates its Centennial with a three day festival held at Niles West. (Archives, Village of Skokie).

August 14     The Village of Skokie celebrates its Centennial with a parade which begins at Niles East and ends at Niles West. The temperature reaches 95 degrees. (Archives, Village of Skokie).

August     Mayor Gorell appoints the Downtown Skokie Task Force for the purpose of redeveloping the downtown area. (The Life, October 24, 1991).

The Skokie Park District opens the "Emily Oaks Nature Center" at Emily Park. (History of the Skokie Park District, p. 12, Archives, Skokie Park District).

The Skokie Park District opens the "Oakton Park Water Playground" at Oakton Park. (History of the Skokie Park District, p. 12, Archives, Skokie Park District).

September    Construction work begins at the old Teletype site for the Village Crossing Shopping Center. (Skokie Review, June 18, 1992).

1989  (March)     The U.S. Office of Thrift Supervision declares Skokie Federal Savings and Loan insolvent and assumes management of the institution. (Skokie Review, December 27, 1990, p.6).

March 20     District 73 1/2 voters approve a tax rate increase by a margin of 2:1. (Skokie Review, December 27, 1990, p.8).

June     Curbside recycling is instituted village wide. (The Life, December 27, 1990, p.5)

August     The Kenton School site is sold by District 69 to the Arie Crown Hebrew Day School for $3,000,000.00. (Coninx, op.cit. p. 30).

September     District 69 enrollment is 1,610 pupils. (Coninx, op.cit. p. 30).

November     Several new stores, including Montgomery Ward and Jewel, open in the new Village Crossing Shopping Center located at the old Teletype site at Touhy and Carpenter Rd. (The Life, December 27, 1990, p. 5 / Skokie Review, June 18, 1992).

November 9     The Berlin Wall is breached. The citizens of the German Democratic Republic are now free to travel to the West. (Encyclopedia Britannica, Multimedia Edition, 1999).

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1990 to 1999

1990  (January)     Skokie Village Trustees approve a Tax Incremental Finance District for the downtown area. (Skokie Review, December 27, 1990).

February     Skokie Federal Savings & Loan is sold by the Resolution Trust Company to Affiliated Bank group for $10,000,000.00. (Skokie Review, December 27, 1990, p. 6).

February     Skokie Village Board pledges $3,000,000.00 to aid in the construction of Centre East39 to be located adjacent to the Hilton Hotel. (Skokie Review, May 2, 1991).

June     Section 15 of the Luxembourg Brotherhood of America hosts its first Sauerbraten dinner since 1966 at the Skokie V.F.W Hall. (Archives, Luxembourg Brotherhood of America).

July     The traveling wall, a Vietnam War Memorial, comes to Oakton Park. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 30).

October 3     Pre-World War II Germany is reunited when the German Democratic Republic is merged into the Federal Republic of Germany. (Encyclopedia Britannica, Multimedia Edition, 1999).

November 9     Joseph J. Witry of Skokie is posthumously inducted into the Chicago Sports Hall of Fame. He joins fellow Skokien George Ireland. (Program Book, Chicago Sports Hall of Fame, November 9, 1990).

Skokie population is 59,432. The racial composition of the Village is:

         White - 82%

         African-American - 2.2%

         Asian - 15.6%

         Other - .2%

(1990 Census / MDR Demographics Applications, Inc., Skokie Public Library, Long Range Planning Committee, 1999).

1991  (March 19)     Oakton Community College officials unveil a $30,000,000.00 plan to raze the former Niles East High School and construct a new eastern satellite campus. (Skokie Review, March 21, 1991).

April     District 69 and the Skokie Park District enter into a lease agreement permitting the Park District to use the property for soccer fields. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 31).

May 13     James Eaves assumes command of the Skokie Fire Department. He is the first African-American department head in Village history. He succeeds Thomas Quillin who left in October, 1990 for a job in Tallahassee, Florida. (Skokie Review, April 25, 1991).

May 20    Skokie Village Trustees adopt a three quarter percent sales tax effective September 1st. (Skokie Review, May 23, 1991).

June 12    The Chicago Bulls defeat the Los Angeles Lakers for their first NBA championship. (Chicago Tribune, June 13, 1991).

June 15 - 16     Skokie's first Festival of Cultures is held at Oakton Park. (Skokie Review, June 13, 1991).

June 20     The Village of Skokie, by Quit Claim Deed, conveys the fire house, located at 8031 Floral Avenue, to the Skokie Park District. (Archives, Skokie Park District).

June 30     An "All Faith Walk of Lights" is held. Approximately 300 marchers from Skokie's many faiths walked from Oakton Park to the Village Green between the Library and Village Hall. It is held in response to grafitti damage at several Skokie synagogues. (Skokie Review, July 4, 1991, p. 3).

August 13     Seattle-based Nordstrom announces that it will build a 200,000 square foot building in Old Orchard to be opened in 1994. (Skokie Review, August 15, 1991).

September 29     "Goat", a painted steel piece of statuary by Chicago artist Jerry Peart, is installed at Skokie-North Shore Sculpture Park. It is the first art to be installed. (Skokie Review, October 31, 1991).

December 19     The Skokie Planning Commission approves site plans and variation requests for the redevelopment of Old Orchard Shopping Center. (Skokie Review, December 26, 1991).

1992  (February 1)     Hyatt Lincolnwood Hotel at Touhy and Lincoln Avenue changes its name to the Radisson Hotel Lincolnwood. (Skokie Review, February 13, 1992).

February 3     Village Board of Trustees approves the redevelopment of Old Orchard. (Skokie Review, February 6, 1992 / December 31, 1992, p.6).

February 10     The Brod Electric Shop at 8021 Lincoln Avenue is razed. (Archives, Skokie Historical Society).

May     Lincoln Junior High School Principal James B. Metzinger retires after 33 years of service in District 69. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 32).

June 1     Village of Skokie announces the redevelopment of the former North Shore Railroad Station site on Dempster Street. The station is to be razed. (Skokie Review, May 28, 1992, June 4, 1992).

June     The Chicago Bulls defeat the Portland Trail Blazers for their second NBA championship.

June 30     District 219 superintendent John Hinck retires. Errol Frank is appointed as Hinck's successor. (Skokie Life, February 13, 1992 / Skokie Review, December 31, 1992, p.6).

September     District 69 enrollment is 1,237 pupils. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 32) St. Peter Catholic School enrollment is 311. (Buisseret et.al., op.cit., 9. 123).

September 20     The Engine House at 8031 Floral Avenue is dedicated as "Skokie Heritage Museum at The Historic Engine House and Log Cabin." In the 1966 Master Plan for the redevelopment of downtown Skokie, the Engine House was described as follows: "The retention of the fire station building as an outstanding architectural landmark is not warranted." (News (Skokie), August 3, 1967, p. 18 / Jean Doney Scrapbooks, 1967-69, Frame 690, SPL).

October 9     Willard C. Galitz, born in Niles Center on April 29, 1901, former Chairman and President of the First National Bank of Skokie, dies at the age of 91. (Archives, Haben Funeral Home, Skokie, IL).

October 16     Long time local funeral director R. William Haben dies at the age of 63. (The Life, November 5, 1992).

November 15     Raymond V. Krier, former Democratic Committeeman of Niles Township, and son of former Committeeman, Martin "Scotty" Krier, dies. (The Life, November 19, 1992).

December 1     Daniel D. Brown, Director of Parks and Recreation of the Skokie Park District, resigns. Brown was hired in 1976. (The Life, November 5, 1992).

1993  (February)     The Village of Skokie announces that it intends to raze the North Shore Station and Train Depot at Dempster Street in order to create a new transportation center. (Reporter, Nadig Newspapers, Week of March 31, 1996, V. 32, No. 13, p.1).

March 2     Albert J. Smith, former Mayor of Skokie, dies at the age of 78. (Skokie Review, March 4, 1993, p. 3).

April     Park Board President Martin Peccia retires from the Board of Park Commissioners. (Skokie Review, December 3, 1992).

April     District 69 voters defeat a referendum to increase the Educational and Operations fund. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 33).

June 20     The Chicago Bulls defeat the Phoenix Suns for their third NBA championship. (Chicago Tribune, June 21, 1993).

September    District 69 enrollment is 1,369 pupils. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 33)

November     District 69 voters defeat a referendum to increase the Educational fund. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 33).

1994  (May 22)     His Eminence, Joseph Cardinal Bernardin, concelebrates Mass at St. Peter Catholic Church, celebrating the 125th Anniversary of the parish and the Church building's Centennial. (Buisseret, et.al., op.cit., pp. 42, 48).

June 30     Cecilia Aitken resigns as Principal of Lincoln Jr. High; Joan Thalman retires as Principal of Madison School; Rose Gordon retires as Principal of Edison School. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 34).

June 30     Dr. Errol Frank resigns as Superintendent of Education of High School District 219. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 34).

September     Heather Morris is appointed Principal of Edison School; Mr. Robert Fehrs is appointed Principal of Lincoln Jr. High; Peter Davis is appointed Principal of Madison School. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 34).

September     District 69 enrollment is 1,406 pupils. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 33).

The Fair Lanes Bowling Alley at 4833 Oakton Street closes its doors and the property is sold to the Village of Skokie for redevelopment. (Skokie Review, March 27, 1997, p. 4).

1995  (March 19)     Michael Jordan "un-retires" and rejoins his Chicago Bulls teammates in Indianapolis. He wears number 45. (Sports Illustrated, The Chicago Collection, February 11, 1998, p.158).

September     District 69 enrollment is 1,365 pupils. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 35).

December 1     NBD merges with First National Bank of Chicago. NBD Skokie ceases to exist as a separate bank and becomes a branch of First National Bank of Chicago. (Recollection, Lauretta M. Burke).

OCC District 535 dedicates the Ray Hartstein Campus, formerly the site of Niles East High School.

1996  (February 26)     Keeper of the National Register of Historic Landmarks reverses her earlier decision and lists the "North Shore Station and Depot" at Dempster Street on the National Register of Historic Places. (Reporter, Nadig Newspapers, Week of March 31, 1996, V. 32, No. 13, p.1).

June 17     The Chicago Bulls defeat the Seattle SuperSonics for their fourth NBA championship. (Chicago Tribune, June 18, 1996).

September     Kindergarten Space Program, a joint day care program of the Skokie Park District and District 69, is initiated at Madison School. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 36).

October 21     The Niles Township Federation of Teachers strikes High School District 219 for the 5th time in 24 years and first time in 11 years. The strike lasts for 10 days. (Skokie Review, January 2, 1997, p. 11).

November 6     The North Shore Center for the Performing Arts opens with a gala dinner and show. (Skokie Review, January 2, 1997, p. 6).

1997  (January 13)     District 219 Board of Education ratifies a new 4 year contract with its teachers. (Skokie Review, January 16, 1997, p. 3).

January 17     The Adam Harrer house at 5309 Oakton Street is gutted by fire. (Skokie Review, January 23, 1997).

January 17     State Representative Louis I. Lang of Skokie is elected Assistant Majority Leader. (Skokie Review, February 6, 1997, p. 3).

January     The North Shore Hilton announces that it has been sold and will re-open as the North Shore Doubletree Hotel in April. (Skokie Review, January 16, 1997, p. 3).

January     The Skokie Park District wins 5 awards for excellence at the Illinois Parks and Recreation Association convention. (Skokie Review, January 23, 1997, p. 11).

January     Republican Township Committeeman Sheldon Marcus announces that he has formed a slate of candidates run for Niles Township offices. The candidates are Marcus for Supervisor, Bob Hanrahan for Assessor, Herb Root for Clerk and Lourdes Mon, James Hammerschmidt, Reno Massini and Robert Malooly for Trustees. (Skokie Review, January 16, 1997, p. 9 / Skokie Review, January 30, 1997, p. 4).

February     After 31 years in Skokie, Heat Exchangers, Inc., 8100 Monticello Avenue, closes its doors. (Skokie Review, February 6, 1997, p. 3).

March 1     The Village of Skokie enters into a new 20 year water contract with the City of Evanston. (Skokie Review, February 6, 1997, p. 3).

April 2     Mary Patricia Lies, co-owner of Skokie Ace Hardware, and descendant of early Niles Centre settlers, dies at the age of 48 from cancer. (Skokie Review, April 10, 1997, p. 13).

April 8    Aldi Food Stores agrees to construct a new store on the site of the old Fair Lanes Bowling Alley at 4833 Oakton Street. (Skokie Review, April 10, 1997, p. 3).

April     Skokie Park District announces plans to construct a boat ramp on the North Shore channel north of Oakton Street. (Skokie Review, May 1, 1997, p. 15).

May 5     Skokie Village Board of Trustees authorizes that the section of Long Avenue between Old Orchard Rd. and Golf Rd. be renamed "Woods Drive". (Skokie Review, May 8, 1997, p. 4).

May 17     The 7th Annual Festival of Cultures opens at Oakton Park. (Skokie Review, May 22, 1997, p. 5).

May 19     Skokie Village Board of Trustees, in response to the razing of older homes and construction of larger mansion type homes, enacts new "floor area ratio" restrictions on new construction. (Skokie Review, May 22, 1997, p. 3).

June 9     Skokie Village Board of Trustees approves a special use permit for construction of the Great Banc Trust and Company on the site of the razed Mark III restaurant at 3300 Dempster Street. (Skokie Review, June 12, 1997, p. 16).

June 13     The Chicago Bulls defeat the Utah Jazz for their fifth NBA championship. (Chicago Tribune, June 14, 1997).

September 13     Ralph R. Kasten, born in Niles Center in 1917, and long-time Vice-President at First National Bank of Skokie, dies of cancer. (Archives, Haben Funeral Home).

1998  (June)     The Chicago Bulls defeat the Utah Jazz for their sixth NBA championship. Michael Jordan retires.

August    The Skokie Park District opens "Sports Park" at Oakton Street just east of McCormick on property owned by the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District. (Archives, Skokie Park District).

September    District 69 enrollment is 1,413 pupils. (Coninx, op.cit., p. 33).

October 1     First Chicago NBD merges with BancOne of Ohio. (Chicago Tribune, Business Section, p. 1).

1999  (January 4)     Mayor Jacqueline Gorell submits her resignation to the Village Board. Trustee George Van Dusen is sworn in as the Village's 16th Mayor. (Skokie Review, January 7, 1999, p. 3).

April 13     District 69 voters approve a $900,000.00 bond referendum. The proceeds are to be used for construction of four new classrooms at Edison School. (Skokie Review, April 15, 1999, p. 3).

May 26     School District 73 1/2 renames Tripp School after Elizabeth Meyer, early pioneer woman. (Skokie Review, June 3, 1999, p. 3).

August 29     Sr. Mariclare Schulte, O.S.F., a member of the School Sisters of St. Francis, retires from the teaching staff of St. Peter Catholic School and moves to Milwaukee, WI. Her retirement ends the O.S.F. affiliation with St. Peter which began in August, 1893. (Archives, St. Peter Catholic Church / Buisseret et.al., op.cit., p. 13).

September 13     The former First National Bank of Skokie located at 8001 Lincoln Avenue officially becomes a BankOne branch. New signs are unveiled. (Recollection, Richard J. Witry).

October 18     The Skokie Village Board denies a special use permit for the construction of a 5 story / 40 unit condo project for the property encompassing Eddy Optical, Park Cleaners and Handleman Photographic Studios at 8035 - 45 Lincoln Avenue. (Skokie Review, October 21, 1999, p. 3).

December 20     The Skokie Village Board approves a 4 story / 30 unit condo project for the property encompassing Eddy Optical, Park Cleaners and Handleman Photographic Studios at 8035 - 45 Lincoln Avenue. (Skokie Review, December 23, 1999, p. 3).

December 31     The United States cedes sovereignty over the Panama Canal to the Republic of Panama. (Chicago Tribune, January 1, 2000).

December 31     367 days until the start of the 3rd Millenium Anno Domini.

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200040

2000   (January 1)     The first time, since the adoption of the Julian / Gregorian calendars, that four (4) numbers have changed.

February     A group is formed whose purpose is to ban firearms in Skokie. (Skokie Review, February 17, 2000, p. 3).

February 27     Skokie Park District, Village of Skokie, Rush North Shore Medical Center, Chamber of Commerce and Skokie Public Library jointly sponsor "Leapin Lightyears".

February 29     The first leap year, since 1600, for a year ending in 00.

May 20 - 21     The 10th Annual Festival of Cultures is hosted by the Skokie Park District at Oakton Park.

December 31     The last day of both the 20th Century and 2nd Millenium Anno Domini.

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Skokie Historical Society
8031 Floral Avenue
Skokie, Illinois 60077