Skokie Historical Society

The Kindt Family

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kindt were both born in the year 1862 of parents who came to this country from Germany on the same boat in the year 1854.   Their parents were pioneers in these parts (preceded by probably less than a dozen other families) and helped to build Niles Center.   Shortly after their birth they were baptized by Rev. J. Stumpf, an Evangelical Pastor.   Education in these days was limited to the lower grades in a rural public school and several years in the German Church School.   At the age of fourteen they were confirmed in the St. Peter Evangelical Church in Niles Center by Rev. Emil Werner.   From then on they worked with their parents on truck farms until the age of twenty-five when they were married in the same church by the Rev. Henry Wolf in the year 1887.   Their whole life (75 years) has been spent within less than two miles from where they now reside.   They recall the building of Lincoln Avenue as a private toll road ( about year 1870) the first gate at what is now the intersection of Lincoln Avenue and Carpenters Road in Niles Center and the last gate at Lincoln, Fullerton and Halsted Streets, which at that time was the north end of Chicago.   They have seen the transition of forest to a rich truck farm territory which today has been subdivided to a great extent; homemade tallow candles to electricity; rough trails to concrete highways; farmers traveling in crude built carts drawn by oxen to automobiles.


After they were married they started a truck farm of their own on Howard Street where they lived until the year 1901 when they moved into the village.   Mr. Kindt then worked in Klehm's General Store for fourteen years after which he spent sixteen years hauling the mail between the Niles Center Post Office and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad Station at Morton Grove (Mr. Kindt boasts that regardless of weather and condition of roads he never missed the mail train - if he was late "the train was late also").   This job terminated in the year 1930 and from then on they have lived more or less in retirement, but always finding things to do, so life to them has never become monotonous.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kindt were both born in the year 1862 of parents who came to this country from Germany on the same boat in the year 1854.   Their parents were pioneers in these parts (preceded by probably less than a dozen other families) and helped to build Niles Center.   Shortly after their birth they were baptized by Rev. J. Stumpf, an Evangelical Pastor.   Education in these days was limited to the lower grades in a rural public school and several years in the German Church School.   At the age of fourteen they were confirmed in the St. Peter Evangelical Church in Niles Center by Rev. Emil Werner.   From then on they worked with their parents on truck farms until the age of twenty-five when they were married in the same church by the Rev. Henry Wolf in the year 1887.   Their whole life (75 years) has been spent within less than two miles from where they now reside.   They recall the building of Lincoln Avenue as a private toll road ( about year 1870) the first gate at what is now the intersection of Lincoln Avenue and Carpenters Road in Niles Center and the last gate at Lincoln, Fullerton and Halsted Streets, which at that time was the north end of Chicago.   They have seen the transition of forest to a rich truck farm territory which today has been subdivided to a great extent; homemade tallow candles to electricity; rough trails to concrete highways; farmers traveling in crude built carts drawn by oxen to automobiles.

 

After they were married they started a truck farm of their own on Howard Street where they lived until the year 1901 when they moved into the village.   Mr. Kindt then worked in Klehm's General Store for fourteen years after which he spent sixteen years hauling the mail between the Niles Center Post Office and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad Station at Morton Grove (Mr. Kindt boasts that regardless of weather and condition of roads he never missed the mail train - if he was late "the train was late also").   This job terminated in the year 1930 and from then on they have lived more or less in retirement, but always finding things to do, so life to them has never become monotonous.

Author: W.H.S.
Dated: October 27th, 1937

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Skokie Historical Society